stress

Why do smokers find such solace in cigarettes? It may be the nicotine, and as a study explains those who have a hard time controlling their emotions may turn to smoking as a way to self-medicate. New CDC data completely supports that assertion.
Don't have the money for an elite wellness getaway? Here are some low-budget alternatives.
We know that excess noise can negatively impact human quality of life, for instance, by introducing stress-inducing stimuli to a previously placid environment. But what impact does extraneous noise have on birds? Since they must rely on hearing for communication and safety, excess background noise can threaten their survival. 
Carrie Fisher’s tragic death after last week’s inflight medical emergency is sadly an all too familiar occurrence. Learn how to improve your travel health and safety whenever possible.
With the evidence already established regarding known upticks of cardiac (or heart-related) deaths around Christmas and New Year’s, a new study seeks to elucidate if winter is a main culprit.
Are the very real physical costs of your outrage worth it? Albeit the election, contentious divorce or nonstop negativity, there are tangible prices to our responses to these and other types of triggers.
We're excited to report that a new study in Health Affairs provides us with another metric that we have previously known and repeatedly been shown in the literature (and in medical practice): Life expectancy and well-being are positively linked.  
Finally, a study where espousing the thought -- If you cared about my heart and well-being, then you wouldn’t stress me -- could be a win-win. Can anger trigger a heart attack? How about intense physical activity? Here's a closer look at heart health and heartbreak.  
Had your vaccine, but still stressed about possibly getting the flu? That is the worst thing you can do. There s strong evidence that stress affects the immune system and can make you more susceptible to infections.
A large meta-analysis by researchers working in the United Kingdom found what we already knew: stress might be bad for your health.
Last week, we exposed the flaws of a study published by a group from the Harvard School of Public Health claiming that girls who drink more sugar sweetened soda have their first period a few months earlier than those who don t. ACSH s Dr. Josh Bloom concluded that