vegetables

Spring is just around the corner, and with it comes another growing season. Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables can help lower calorie intake; reduce risks for heart disease, obesity and Type 2 diabetes; and protect against certain cancers.

With all these benefits, why do some consumers choose to avoid produce? Approximately three-quarters of people in the U.S. don’t eat enough fruits and vegetables, according to the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

A lot of factors could explain the shortfall, including fear. Media stories about topics such as GMOs and pesticides may convince some consumers that it’s not safe to eat certain fruits and vegetables. There’s no question that negative news...

It might be the one problem that all parents have in common, but whose solution is maddeningly hard to implement: Getting children to move beyond their howls of protest to adopt a behavior that's both good for them and their overall development. 

These traditional battleground behaviors include (but surely are not limited to) doing household chores, reading for "enjoyment" and the ol' favorite that has stood the test of time ... eating fruits and vegetables. 

Flummoxed parents have lost countless hours of sleep searching for solutions. And while some will stand firm, say all the right things to their kids and strive to be principled and convincing, there's another group which believes providing incentives -- critics would call it bribery -- is an effective way to go....

lots-of-cabbage-1431124-mWhen it comes to using microwave ovens, all the usual suspects line up to attack the appliance. The fountain of misinformation, Joe Mercola warns it kills more people than cigarettes and asbestos. Natural news, which is run by Mike Adams (who makes Mercola seem like Louis Pasteur) claims that everything from obesity to erectile dysfunction is caused by the...

Heart-HealthyFor years the Environmental Working Group (EWG) has been publishing its lists of vegetables and fruits that supposedly are contaminated with the largest amounts of pesticides. Although the greatest preponderance of the produce samples have only very low traces of pesticides, EWG loudly trumpets which ones are most affected, with the implication, of course, that these should be avoided or at least that organic versions should be used. Their implication, of course, is that organic produce has fewer pesticide residues, although they have never listed those approved for use on organic produce.

Now, the...