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Screen Shot 2014-08-20 at 12.32.26 PMRegular Dispatch readers will know that we have discussed BPA perhaps the poster child of the anti chemical movement until we are blue in the face (BTF?).

So, it is always nice to know that there are others out there who really understand this topic and agree with us scientifically.

One of these is Steve Hentges, Ph.D., who currently holds the position of Executive Director of the Polycarbonate/BPA Global Group of the American Chemistry Council (ACC). Dr. Hentges is a highly trained organic chemist whose advanced...

466583_32876683If you believe what you read about BPA and its harmful effects on human health, a topic that we here at ACSH have taken on many times, the latest development from Frederick vom Saal, Professor of Biological Sciences at Missouri University and perhaps the best-known fringe anti-BPA activist posing as a scientist, might stop your shopping habits, or at least make you think twice before choosing to get a receipt. In his latest...

The 9/11 cancer report is not the only sound-science publication whose results have been met with knee-jerk dismissal. Another landmark federal study described by renowned endocrinologist Dr. Richard Sharpe as majestically scientific has found that the actual human exposure to bisphenol A (BPA), even from a BPA-rich diet, is exceedingly small.

BPA is a chemical found in a variety of food containers and plastics. Published in the journal Toxicological Studies, the study was led by...

BPA is in the news, yet again. WPFO-TV (Fox 23) reports that Maine s Board of Environmental Protection has postponed plans to ban BPA from baby products until studies prove that the alternatives are safe.

Maine has made a very intelligent decision. I have never heard of anyone proposing that BPA-free products first be studied for safety before the headlong rush to ban it. Cheers to Maine for addressing this primary question, says ACSH's Dr. Elizabeth Whelan.

Meanwhile, Atlantic food...

bpaHe s back at it again. Democratic Senator Ed Markey of Massachusetts (along with two of his acolytes in the House) is now introducing a bill that would ban BPA from food and beverage containers. The Ban Poisonous Additives Act of 2014, as the bill is named, would also give waivers to those manufacturers who want to seek safer alternatives to BPA, while requiring them to label their packaging as containing BPA.

The bill s purpose, according to its supporters, is to protect consumers, specifically the elderly, pregnant...

As part of a legal settlement with the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), the FDA must decide by tomorrow whether it will ban the widely used chemical bisphenol A (BPA). The agency s decision will determine if the chemical used to make polycarbonate plastic can remain in food packaging.

BPA-based plastics have been used for decades to protect against bacteria and food-borne illness. Even so, earlier this month, the Campbell Soup Company seems to have succumbed to public pressure and announced it would be eliminating BPA in the lining of its cans. But one of the biggest questions on everyone s mind is: What will they use...

967632_38993259Last month, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) weighed in on bisphenol A (BPA), saying exactly what we ve said all along, BPA poses no health risk to consumers because current exposure to the chemical is too low to cause harm. As Steve Hentges points out in his piece on Science 2.0, this assessment, like those of the U.S. FDA and other scientific bodies, relied on studies showing 1)...

A new study from the Harvard School of Public Health reports that eating canned soup significantly raises the concentration of the chemical bisphenol-A (BPA) in urine. BPA has been under constant attack from environmental groups alleging that despite its five-decade long history of widespread, safe use it is an endocrine disruptor.

For the study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, 75 participants consumed a 12-ounce serving of either canned vegetable soup or fresh vegetable soup daily for five days. At the end of the study period, researchers analyzed each participant s urine for BPA which lines most food and...

New York NY -- January 15th, 2010. The American Council on Science and Health applauds today's decision by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) not to ban the plastic hardener bisphenol-A (BPA). Despite heavy pressure from various activist "environmental" groups, the FDA has not placed any restrictions on the chemical's use in consumer products but rather decided to "support" industry's decisions to reduce exposure to BPA in food-related products aimed at infants and children. FDA is also "facilitating" the development of alternatives to BPA in infant formula cans.

FDA stopped well short of a ban on this common and useful chemical, which has been in safe use in a wide spectrum of consumer products for over 50 years. ACSH scientists are glad a ban was avoided...

Various media outlets are reporting on groups in several localities pushing for stricter bans on BPA, including the Breast Cancer Fund.

We all need to take a sober look at the BPA situation, says Dr. Whelan. It shows us that irrationality has run rampant. There s a disconnect between the science on the safety of BPA versus these activists strident calls for extending bans on BPA. There is no science to support them.

Yet Ban BPA has become an environmentalist mantra, adds Dr. Ross.