In The Media

1. In USA Today, Dr. Alex Berezow had some context for the CNN organization about socialism, which has grown increasingly shrill and bizarre as its market share and credibility have declined. 

2. CNET covered our work on how disgusting your mattress can be. We wouldn't sweat it (pardon the joke) but when you have two microbiologists on staff that is the kind of discussion that happens

But that wasn't all. In another article they discussed our work...

The Winter 2018 issue of Priorities magazine is now available from the American Council on Science and Health, since 1978 America's premier pro-science consumer advocacy non-profit,. You can't subscribe and you can't buy it on newsstands. The only way to get it is absolutely free.The print version is sent without cost to donors who have made a tax-deductible donation of $100 or more (it's expensive to print, and we don't sell ads or subscriptions) and is available as a free download to everyone.

In this issue:

Page 1. "The Compassionate Case For Coal" by Hank Campbell, President of the American Council on Science and Health.

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1. NPR linked to our work on the flu, which we predicted would be a concern for the US after seeing it go through Australia, with 5 Things You Need To Know.

2. In Fox News, we were featured in an article on dismantling junk science regulations. Though media seem to have only rediscovered concern about making sure science regulations are evidence-based in the last year, there were unprecedented levels of strange...

1. You may recall that a computer scientist who has positioned himself as an expert on global warming is suing the science journal PNAS for publishing an article - led by a researcher at NOAA - debunking his paper claiming that 100 percent alternative energy would be viable right now if only politicians would get out of the way.

He says they should not have published the rebuttal because they gave his 2015 paper an award for “outstanding scientific excellence and originality.”

Isn't the best reason to publish a rebuttal when the original is shown to be so flawed as to be unusable? Not to Stanford's Mark Jacobson. He thinks they hurt his reputation. Actually, it hurt theirs. Clearly a paper that got an award yet was then debunked shows their peer review of...

1. In Las Vegas Review-Journal, Dr. Josh Bloom wrote about a worthwhile effort to combat deaths due to illegal opioids which has transformed into government interfering in the doctor-patient relationship. Though bad doctors have been arrested, and "pill mills" shut down, the overwhelming majority of harm has come from illegal purchases, not cancer patients in real pain. You can read his article here.

2. In Reason, science journalist Ron Bailey delves into the same topic, wondering if the pain relief benefits of prescription opioids outweigh their addiction risks...

1. Medicare Part D was controversial during its passage yet now is regarded as a success - and it may be the future of Obamacare. Making that case was no less than a Senator who was against Medicare Part D at the time, Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, whom I met at the American Action Forum meeting. Some of the stated intentions of the Affordable Care Act were similar - Part D has a private-sector model which leverages competition and innovation to reduce beneficiaries’ drug costs - but the execution has been so flawed as...

The American Council on Science and Health, since 1978 America's premier pro-science consumer advocacy non-profit, is pleased to announce the fall edition of our Priorities magazine.

The print magazine is sent free of charge to donors who have made a tax-deductible donation of $100 or more (it's expensive to print, and we don't sell ads or subscriptions, but sometimes donors do sponsor reprints to give away) and is available as a free download to all.

Page 1. Why We Fight by Hank Campbell, President of the American Council on Science...

1. Do you consider yourself a conservationist? A group of advocacy journalists and environmentalists in North Carolina don't. James Womack, on the American Council on Science and Health Board of Scientific Advisors, recently got scorn for being appointed to a state oil and gas commission. It wasn't because of his qualifications, he is arguably the most qualified person there, it was because he was filling a slot described as being for a "conservation" group - and Womack is not proactively endorsing bans on everything, which ticked off writers for anti-science groups.

If he had ever donated $25 to Sierra Club, or any other organization that hates poor people, these activists believe he could be qualified for a conservation slot, but if he helps the pro-science...

1. I forgot to link to our article in The Telegraph last month. We are the American Council on Science and Health, but since America leads the world in science output, Nobel prizes and adult science literacy, our scope is truly international. In our piece, we discuss what is ailing European science and why they consistently lag behind, and that reason is the timidity of their precautionary principle plus being hijacked by a bureaucracy that makes improvements easy to block and expensive to implement.

2. On NPR, Dr. Alex Berezow talked about...

1. Miami Herald, Asheville Courier-Tribune and Australia's News Observer covered our work on this year's flu vaccine. We may be the American Council on Science and Health, but our reach has always been international. Meanwhile, the Washington Post, Boston Globe's STAT and others were doing a giant disservice to those here at home by letting journalists with no critical thinking write...