In The Media

1. In Fox News, Henry Miller, MD, and Alex Berezow, PhD, note the uncomfortable truth a whole lot of people attending science march did not want to admit before the second science march - it was first about being against Trump, second about being against Pruitt, third about being against Republicans, and finally about being for the science issues Democrats accept more readily than Republicans. So a whole lot of signs, a whole lot of anti-science environmental groups sponsoring stuff, and hardly a mention of agriculture (except organic food), medicine (except the alternatives to medicine) and no mention...

1. NPR used us to fact check the claims of a California judge who declared that coffee must come with a cancer warning - because the beans are roasted and IARC has declared everything a carcinogen. Various regional NPR sites also carried us. The links are at the bottom.

No one really pays attention to these warning labels in California by now - IARC has also declared bacon, tea and toast, plus the frying pan for the egg (so basically of breakfast) a carcinogen - but it's the trial lawyers who are behind this. In the 1970s, the litigation group Center for Science in the Public...

1. Just a week after we taunted anti-science activists for collaborating with Russian propaganda outlets to undermine US agriculture supremacy - those capitalist pigs will pay for their crimes against sugar beets now, eh, comrades? - we were at it again, which means Russia Today and Sputnik will be hammering away at their political sympathizers in the organic food and solar power industry to hack our Wikipedia page and send out Tweets noting that 35 years ago we got a small grant from Chevron, or whatever they are doing to try and undermine science this week.

Like a batboy living in a cave, it used to be the...

Andrew Kimbrell, Center for Food Safety. The archetype of the puffy, rich, white 'haole activist from the mainland' that Hawaiians hate. Screenshot: Poisoning Paradise

I was on vacation in Europe earlier this week but five days before I left I had gotten an email asking if I might be willing to appear on a panel at a film festival called Festival du Film et Forum International sur les Droits Humains (International Film Festival and Forum on Human Rights), which was scheduled to be in conjunction with the March session of the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva.

I like films, I am all for human rights, and trains are easy in Europe, so it sounded like a fine way to spend a March 13th evening, but then I learned I was taking the place of a corporation called Syngenta (an agricultural science company, so they make seeds and chemicals) that is in Switzerland, and the movie the panel...

In the 1990s, a term began to become propagated around the science community; watermelons. These were people who were 'green on the outside but red on the inside'. And those people were the new generation of environmentalists. Essentially, unlike their ancestors in environmentalism, they did not care about people, they only cared about tearing down institutions, like companies and universities and the free market itself. 

That movement only gathered steam through the early part of this century, once science media went into decline while environmental activism shot past the billion dollar mark on its way to the $2 billion it's at now. 

It's little surprise that the Russians have worked with the leaders of anti-science groups to leverage their "useful idiots" in the...

1. ACSH testified at the House of Representatives Committee on Science, Space, and Technology meeting to discuss our ongoing concern about activism inside the Working Groups of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Since 2015 we have been concerned that IARC insiders have gotten rules changed so that any academic with industry experience is banned from participating but people working for environmental groups are allowed. The only thing they consider a conflict of interest is corporate consulting. Worse, it turns out that activist Dr. Chris Portier was not only getting paid by Environmental Defense Fund, he signed a contract with a trial lawyer in California to help sue Monsanto (in that state IARC inclusion means automatic inclusion on the California...

1. In USA Today, Dr. Alex Berezow had some context for the CNN organization about socialism, which has grown increasingly shrill and bizarre as its market share and credibility have declined. 

2. CNET covered our work on how disgusting your mattress can be. We wouldn't sweat it (pardon the joke) but when you have two microbiologists on staff that is the kind of discussion that happens

But that wasn't all. In another article they discussed our work...

The Winter 2018 issue of Priorities magazine is now available from the American Council on Science and Health, since 1978 America's premier pro-science consumer advocacy non-profit,. You can't subscribe and you can't buy it on newsstands. The only way to get it is absolutely free.The print version is sent without cost to donors who have made a tax-deductible donation of $100 or more (it's expensive to print, and we don't sell ads or subscriptions) and is available as a free download to everyone.

In this issue:

Page 1. "The Compassionate Case For Coal" by Hank Campbell, President of the American Council on Science and Health.

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1. NPR linked to our work on the flu, which we predicted would be a concern for the US after seeing it go through Australia, with 5 Things You Need To Know.

2. In Fox News, we were featured in an article on dismantling junk science regulations. Though media seem to have only rediscovered concern about making sure science regulations are evidence-based in the last year, there were unprecedented levels of strange...

1. You may recall that a computer scientist who has positioned himself as an expert on global warming is suing the science journal PNAS for publishing an article - led by a researcher at NOAA - debunking his paper claiming that 100 percent alternative energy would be viable right now if only politicians would get out of the way.

He says they should not have published the rebuttal because they gave his 2015 paper an award for “outstanding scientific excellence and originality.”

Isn't the best reason to publish a rebuttal when the original is shown to be so flawed as to be unusable? Not to Stanford's Mark Jacobson. He thinks they hurt his reputation. Actually, it hurt theirs. Clearly a paper that got an award yet was then debunked shows their peer review of...