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In late 2015, the American Council on Science and Health was asked to testify at the White House on the impact of the Food and Drug Administration's "deeming regulations," granted to it by the 2009 Tobacco Control Act, to cover all tobacco products.

This was after numerous other times that state, local and federal officials had asked for guidance on this complex subject. We made those recommendations, and it looks more and more like our advice will win the day, at least based on a committee vote today.

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At first glance, it might seem like urbanites would have a leg up on rural communities when it comes to science acceptance. Urban dwellers are generally better educated, which in the past has translated to greater wealth (1, see Notes below), and that translates into less thinking about basic needs and more about cultural issues.

That isn't really the case when it comes to science acceptance...

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Why are saturated fats healthy again? Why do the latest nutritional guidelines still have a very low cap on salt despite all the contradictory data?

There is a lot of confirmation bias in nutrition and those end-oriented beliefs make it easy to unconsciously mold results to match the numbers to the goal, like doing surveys about food recall and subtly quantifying the results one way or the other. Then it's off to publish a diet book or become an expert on the latest...

On Thursday, as a private citizen who embraces free-market solutions over government regulation whenever possible, I signed a letter thanking the United States Senate for its work negating a rather onerous Vermont genetically modified organism (GMO) labeling law (1) while affirming that it is too flawed to protect the public from the bad science at the core of the state's decision-making, and therefore unnecessary.

The intent of the Senate is noble enough. Vermont essentially copied and pasted ...

Drug price control advocates say they have almost 550,000 register voter signatures and will present them to California state election officials by Monday, November 2nd in order to qualify The California Drug Price Relief Act referendum for the November 2016 presidential election ballot in California. They need only 365,880 signatures.

Their goal is to revise California law to require state programs to pay the same drug prices as the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. The V.A. generally pays 20% to 24% less than any government program, the proponents claim, and since this will be outside California government, politicians would be unable to modify it, much like Proposition 65 is implemented with no recourse by voters or representatives - and why the state will be forced to...

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Campbell Soup Co., which makes a variety of foods including the namesake soups and Prego pasta sauce, has declared its intent to put labels on its foods, noting they are "partially produced with genetic engineering."

Some are lamenting this will be a slippery slope to process labels being used as warnings, and undermining confidence in modern agriculture, while anti-science groups are hailing it as a victory. US Right To Know, an outreach group funded by organic food corporations and aided by the partisan attack site SourceWatch, is certainly declaring this a big win for its...

NOThe surest way to avoid worrying about getting the Zika virus is avoid being bitten by a mosquito transmitting it. That means sales of repellents are very likely to boom. Almost all products to keep mosquitoes away contain the active ingredient N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide, commonly called DEET. Even the CDC recommends it.

It is not perfect, though. For one thing, it is a repellent, not a pesticide. Some say we should kill bugs so that they never harm anyone and they have asked why we...

Neil Pearce, a professor at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, has risen to the defense of the controversial International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), but falling back on hollow claims of IARC's superiority will do  little to dispel the serious questions about the Agency's process.

Pearce opens his piece by endorsing last week’s ruling by a California court finding that Monsanto – the maker of the most widely-used herbicide Roundup -- was liable for a rare cancer that developed in a grounds-keeper who had used the herbicide. Roundup contains the chemical glyphosate as its active ingredient. The court...

Last month, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), which operates under the auspices of the U.N. World Health Organization, announced it would solicit comments from interested parties prior to holding an Advisory Group meeting in November to propose revisions to its Preamble.

The preamble articulates the mission and methods of the IARC Monographs program and an update has been long overdue. The Monographs program has been embroiled in controversy brought on by questions regarding its assessments of cell phones, acrylamide, formaldehyde, red and processed meat, coffee, and the herbicide glyphosate. That last one may have been the last straw. The World Health Organization, of which IARC is a part, disavowed their methodology, as...

The World Health Organization group International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) is suffering through a period of critical upheaval. Thanks to investigative work spearheaded by independent blogger David Zaruk, Ph.D., the ethical breaches of IARC environmental activist Chris Portier, Ph.D., who massaged Working Group criteria to exclude experts with any industry experience while exempting his paychecks from Environmental Defense Fund, have been exposed. That Portier signed a lucrative contract with attorneys looking to sue Monsanto before...