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The common weed killer Roundup (glyphosate) is back in the news after a US court ruled it contributed to a man’s terminal cancer (non-Hodgkin lymphoma). Following the court’s order for manufacturer Monsanto to compensate the former school ground’s keeper US$289 million, more than 9,000 people are reportedly also suing the company.

In light of this, Cancer Council Australia is calling for Australia to review glyphosate’s safety. And tonight’s...

In our modern industrialized food society, it's easy to lose awareness of how food is made. In the 19th century, when food was just becoming industrialized, it was fascinating to city dwellers. Factories gave tours, but it was certainly not without shock to the public who witnessed the process. "It's better not to know" thinking became so prevalent that, to make his case about 19th century politics, German Chancellor Otto von Bismarck once said, "Laws are like sausages. It's better not to see them being made" and that resonated with the public. Today, the public would still contextually know what it means, even if 98 percent of Americans do not work on a farm...

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Cornfield via Shutterstock

No matter how many times its claims are rebuffed, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) continues to assert that various chemicals are, at least to some extent, carcinogenic.

One of its latest incorrect...

Well before its media talking points were released, it was assumed the World Health Organisation's International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) would name the herbicide glyphosate a probable human carcinogen - in sharp contrast to findings by the EPA, the American Council on Science and Health and every legitimate science body.

How could that be? The short answer is that IARC does no original research, they review studies and their metric for inclusion, along with their metric for picking the panels that meet in secret to make their conclusions, are unknown.

Writing in The Guardian,...

International_Centre_for_Research_on_Cancer_(IARC)_Headquarters_ExteriorThis month s meeting in Lyon, France, of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) the branch of the UN s World Health Organization that studies the relationship between environmental and lifestyle risk factors and cancer focused on pesticides. The committee concluded that of the five pesticides evaluated, three were probably carcinogenic, a 2A classification, despite the fact that neither the U.S. EPA nor the European Chemical Agency had classified these pesticides as such. A...

California’s Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act, commonly called Proposition 65, was enacted by popular vote in 1986. It was initially sold as a way to prevent cancer and birth defects due to chemicals in drinking water and therefore got an overwhelmingly favorable response. Who isn’t in favor of clean water? (1)

Yet unmentioned by most at that time was that the voter referendum turned California science over to political appointees, who have final authority to make decisions on warning labels. In the last 30 years, despite a lot of strange listings and too many nuisance lawsuits to count, few decisions have been as bizarre as their desire to label BPA as a health hazard even though every national science organization has shown otherwise.

If...

The World Health Organisation s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) exists to call things a carcinogen. In their entire history, they have failed to find something carcinogenic in their 900 efforts one time. The reason for their success is simple: In a mainstream media world, combined with the ability to detect almost anything anywhere, it is simple to gather a group of people predisposed to a conclusion, meet in secret, give scientists who might disagree little time to respond, and then release media talking points as fact.

Given the nature of IARC, calling glyphosate probably carcinogenic is actually something of a victory for the evidence-based side. It is assumed IARC would declare every pesticide not used by organic food farmers to be causing cancer, even...

The International Agency for Research on Cancer
(IARC) operates under the auspices of the United Nations World Health Organization with the goal of examining evidence for carcinogenicity (involvement in causing cancer) of specific
exposures. Their belief is that most cancers are linked to environmental factors and are therefore preventable by limiting those, whereas the weight of evidence has shown that most cancers are related to lifestyle (such as smoking or obesity) and genetics or other natural causes (e.g. random mutation.)

Because they are geared toward simpler assessments of hazard and not risk, their findings can be confusing to...

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has a new leader, an Old Guard insider named Dr. Elisabete Weiderpass, who promised not to change the status quo, which means they remain stuck with an old problem; credibility.

While for its first 20 years they were a much-needed voice of reason that stood up to activists claiming that some new chemical of the month was a carcinogen because it could kill rats, for the last 10 IARC have been the source of ridicule among the science community. And that is because the environmentalists whose hype they once exposed played the long game and wormed their way inside.(1)...

1327741_17847026Heart failure affects about six million Americans. This may at least partially explain why the media has been so quick to seize the opportunity to link heart failure with processed meat consumption. The study being referenced was published in Circulation, the publication of the American Heart Association, and claims to have found that processed red meat consumption results in increased risk of incidence and death from heart failure.

Researchers from the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden and Warsaw...