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1. Chicago City Wire called us for scientific insight on a recent proposal to ban good pesticides in order to protect bees. Except bees aren't actually dying. Sure, there was a blip in 2006 but there have been periodic mass die-offs of bees since record-keeping began in the 900 AD time frame. Since then, numbers are higher than ever. Even overwinter losses this year, which is predictably when a lot of bees die, saw the fewest losses since surveys have existed.

“They want Illinois to be for neonics what Vermont was for GMOs: a PR stunt,” I told them. “If you dunk anything in a bucket of goop,...

apple pie via shutterstock
apple pie via shutterstock

Formaldehyde is a known toxin and a carcinogen. We know this from real science, as well as hysteria-based groups like the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) which designated the compound as a...

Just about every evening news channel publicized the possibility that nitrates and nitrites, preservatives found in cured meats, have caused an increase in bladder cancer. Unfortunately, they needlessly frightened their viewers by touting a small increase in bladder cancer incidence based on a study that did not even show that the rise in cancer risk was statistically significant. The study, published in ...

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Does glyphosate—the world’s most heavily-used herbicide—pose serious harm to humans? Is it carcinogenic? Those issues are of both legal and scientific debate.

In two court cases—one decided in mid-March and the...

In what has quickly become the first big health scare of the summer season, the World Health Organization (WHO) — via their cancer evaluation affiliate, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) — released a statement yesterday that classifies the radiofrequency electromagnetic fields associated with cell phones in their category IIB, meaning “possibly carcinogenic to humans.” One news source after another picked up and ran with the story, and links accumulated on Twitter feeds and Facebook pages as the public reacted. And yet, most of this was overreaction.

“This,” says ACSH’s Dr. Elizabeth Whelan, “is a story that causes unnecessary anxiety.”...

A Missouri court of appeals recently tossed out a decision to award $72 million (ten million dollars in actual damages and $62 million in punitive damages) to a woman suing Johnson & Johnson alleging that the company’s baby powder caused her ovarian cancer.

Initially a jury in a St. Louis circuit court initially decided in favor of Jacqueline Fox, 62, of Birmingham, Alabama (who had passed away before her case went to trial).  The plaintiff had claimed that years of use of Johnson & Johnson products containing talcum powder had contributed to her development of ovarian cancer.  This week, an appellate Missouri court reversed the decision to award Ms. Fox the $72 million indicating that...

shutterstock_183195284 Formaldehyde Structure via Shutterstock

I wish that when I was a student of anatomy I could have argued my way out of dissecting stinky cadavers and I would have had a friend in Jennifer Sass, an alarmist who blogs for the Natural Resources Defense Council. She sounds off on a recent report published by the...

1. ACSH testified at the House of Representatives Committee on Science, Space, and Technology meeting to discuss our ongoing concern about activism inside the Working Groups of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Since 2015 we have been concerned that IARC insiders have gotten rules changed so that any academic with industry experience is banned from participating but people working for environmental groups are allowed. The only thing they consider a conflict of interest is corporate consulting. Worse, it turns out that activist Dr. Chris Portier was not only getting paid by Environmental Defense Fund, he signed a contract with a trial lawyer in California to help sue Monsanto (in that state IARC inclusion means automatic inclusion on the California...

When an article says "Don't let this go unshared," over and over again (five times - if we're counting,) I automatically have questions. When the main message of the article scares people with misinformation and flawed science, then I have an article for Monday morning.

The 'Food Babe' has a new article out on glyphosate that fits both of the descriptions above. She claims that there are new data to show that glyphosate used when crops are grown is making it into many of the foods that are in our cupboards.

She states that a "FDA-registered food safety laboratory tested iconic American food for residues of the weed killer glyphosate (aka Monsanto’s Roundup) and found ALARMING amounts." She then goes on...

It is nothing short of amazing that we are still alive, or at the very least, don't all have cancer.

Because if even a fraction of the phony chemical scares that we write about almost every day were real, there'd be no one left alive to read what our dead writers didn't write. Whatever the hell that means.

An oldie, but goody refuses to go away. It is called acrylamide, which is formed during baking or frying of bread, chips, cookies, cereal, and — most notoriously — French fries

The chemical also occurs naturally (no—this does *not* matter) in a variety of vegetables,...