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According to the American Cancer Society (ACS), cancer is now the most economically crippling disease in the world, costing more in lost productivity and lives than any other illness. The ACS contends that the proportion of public and private sector funding for cancer research does not match the disease’s impact on productivity and economic health.

Dismayed by these findings, ACSH’s Dr. Elizabeth Whelan suggests that research geared towards delaying cancer onset should be prioritized. “Ideally, it’s better to prevent...

Pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline, maker of the Nicorette nicotine lozenges, urged the FDA on Monday to treat dissolvable smokeless tobacco products made by tobacco companies the same way as pharmaceutical-made smoking cessation products — by keeping them off the market until they “demonstrate to [the] FDA that their marketing is appropriate for the protection of public health.” But tobacco companies, such as Reynolds American, Inc., maker of the tobacco lozenge Camel Orbs, argue that they do not market these products as quit-smoking...

Unfortunately, not all the news is good news: A recently proposed measure in the Russian Federation, much to our (and all others devoted to reducing the toll of smoking) chagrin, aims to ban the manufacture, sale, and importation of smokeless tobacco products.

ACSH's Dr. Gilbert Ross is urging the Russian government, in website comments and letters to several ministers, to reconsider enacting such a ban. The Russian health authorities are probably not well-versed in the data on harm reduction, and don't know that these products could help the over 40 million Russian smokers quit and reduce their health risk by over 90 percent.

Added ACSH's Dr. Josh Bloom, Since smokeless tobacco itself has almost no health risk, banning it would not only be of no benefit to the health of...

ByeBye cigs, Hello e-cigs

The wise elders of the Massachusetts town of Canton will meet in conclave next Monday the 12th to contemplate how best to reduce the dreadful toll of smoking in their community. The proposed approach includes raising the legal age to purchase tobacco products from 18 to 21. In fact, the measure to be voted on is entitled thusly:

Regulation of the Canton Board of Health:Prohibition of the Sale of Tobacco Products to Minors 2013...

Lisa R. Lauve is the new sheriff at Christus St. Frances Cabrini Hospital in Alexandria, Louisiana, and her first order of business is to cut down on third-hand smoke. Starting July 1 of next year, the entire hospital campus will be subject to an anti-tobacco policy such that current staff members who smoke will have one year to make whatever adjustments they need in order to quit smoking or at least forgo the habit while at work. The idea is to prevent employees from even smelling of tobacco smoke.

According to Lauve, a hospital administrator, when employees smoke, the toxins from their cigarettes linger in the fabric of their clothes and can pose a danger...

ACSH s Dr. Gilbert Ross greeted staff this morning with a spirited Buon giorno! upon his return from the July 2-7 Euroscience Open Forum (ESOF) conference series in Turin, Italy during which ACSH hosted a presentation on Reducing the toll of smoking-related disease and death: the case for tobacco harm reduction. The three keynote speakers included Karl-Olov Fagerstrom, Karl Erik Lund, and Lars Ramstrom world-renowned science and policy experts on tobacco and nicotine.

ACSH's Dr. Gilbert Ross with ESOF presenters Karl-Olov Fagerstrom, Karl Erik Lund, and Lars Ramstrom...

Bloomberg has published a decent piece on the death of Tony Gwynn but, like their namesake, the former mayor of New York City, can't help injecting personal opinion and calling it evidence.

"Gwynn may have been on shaky ground when he insisted that chewing caused his disease. But so is the American Council on Science and Health, which put out a statement headlined: "RIP Tony Gwynn, a victim of parotid gland cancer. NOT due to snuff or dip, however." The statement even includes a shameless plug for snus, a type of smokeless tobacco, from one of the group's physicians, Gil Ross: "It would be a shame if a smoker seeking a way out of his or her deadly...

Today readers of a number of newspapers, including The Wall Street Journal, U.S.A. Today and The New York Daily News, will encounter a full-page advertisement for Camel Snus. The product consists of moist, steam cured tobacco packaged in small sachets that can be inserted under the upper lip and eliminates both the spitting involved with traditional chewing tobacco, as well as the smoke that makes cigarettes so publicly offensive and poses such a risk to one’s lung health.
the ads in question
The advertisements were launched as part of...

SnusThe recently-released deeming regulations by which the FDA proposes to regulate tobacco products and those devices variously known as e-cigarettes, personal vaporizers and mods requires that each product (and perhaps each component) go through a specific approval process. This process can go in one of two directions: those applying for a substantial equivalence approval must prove to the agency s satisfaction that the product is, well, substantially equivalent to a product already on the market as of 2/15/2007; or they must go through a premarket approval process requiring an extraordinarily detailed database showing that not only is...

In a letter to the FDA on modified risk tobacco products (MRTP), a coalition of public health non-profits, including the American Cancer Society, The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, and the American Heart Association, cites the tobacco industry s long history of misleading the public. As is now common knowledge, the industry hid the dangers of cigarette smoking, manipulated their products to enhance addictiveness, and marketed to young people. Now, these non-profits have used this history as a springboard to urge the FDA to establish stringent standards for the marketing of MRTP.

The letter states that tobacco companies are interested only in their bottom-line financial interests, with no regard for the health of Americans. Therefore, before permitting companies to make any...