alternative medicine

Dietary supplement use, albeit nutritional products or alternative medicines, is a very lucrative industry that is for the most part riddled with overly auspicious claims in support of the notion they are a panacea.

Such faulty, unsubstantiated beliefs abound, yet still these by and large unregulated substances manage to enhance the bottom line of countless companies - making them a multi-billion dollar business especially in the adult sphere. Due to the many preventable adverse drug reactions they cause, a team of researchers set out to quantify their use in the pediatric and adolescent populations where such intake data is unclear.

How was this studied

In a letter just...

Every time I'm in Poland, I make several trips to our favorite massage therapist. Because of the exchange rate and the lower cost of labor, I can get an hour-long massage for just over $30.

Our massage therapist is also a bit kooky. She opposes much of what I accept, such as genetically modified food, and she believes in alternative medicine of all types, particularly reflexology. When she pinches your toe, she thinks she's fixing your liver, or something.

One time, due to my poor Polish skills, I accidentally agreed to a cupping session. My personal (and painful) encounter with alternative medicine confirmed what I always thought -- it's a load of garbage. But, I don't...

In our postmodern society -- where truth is relative, "fake news" is prevalent, and scientific facts are just an opinion -- it shouldn't come as a surprise that modern medicine is facing a backlash.

Evidence-based medicine, which is supported by a bedrock of biomedical science, literally has saved the lives of billions of people. Yet, modern medicine has been sustaining an assault from multiple fronts in recent years.

One front has fought against long-standing practices of public health meant to prevent disease, such as vaccination, pasteurization, and water fluoridation. A second front rages against those responsible for treating disease, such as medical doctors and pharmaceutical companies, who have been accused of conspiring against patients, for instance by...

Can't make this s#######t up. Seriously. 

Perhaps the irony that follows was lost on the largest country in the world. But at the American Council, we just love irony because, aside from being just plain fun, it is often associated with junk science. Might want to be sitting down when you read this one. 

In the latest Nikkei Asian Review, there is an article by staff writer Ariana King.  It is called "Americans Distrusting Big Pharma Seek Traditional Chinese Cures." The article, which is mostly a big fat lie, focuses on our opioid, uh, I mean, fentanyl crisis, and how the Chinese want to use ancient concoctions of herbs and acupuncture to help wean us off opiates. (Emphasis mine).

"Now America is beset by an opioid...

One time when I was a little kid, our family visited Arizona. We went to a restaurant somewhere out in the desert that served fried rattlesnake. As you probably guessed, it tastes like chicken.

Rattlesnake meat is perfectly fine to consume. However, snakes and other reptiles, as well as amphibians, can carry Salmonella. That's why it's important for people to wash their hands after handling pet reptiles... or to cook them properly if you plan on eating them. The CDC reports on a person in Kansas who found that out the hard way.

Some people like to take "...

A hot rock massage and herbal tea might make you feel nice, but they don't actually cure anything. Pointing that out in China, however, might land a person in jail.

Dr. Tan Qindong was just released after spending three months in a Chinese jail, and is now possibly awaiting trial, for the crime of criticizing Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), according to Nature News. He learned the hard way that speaking the truth about biomedical science is a very bad career move in that country.

In a blog post, Dr. Tan, who is an anesthesiologist and entrepreneur, said that a popular TCM drug called "Hongmao Medicinal Liquor" was poison. Very little information is available about this particular...

Without a doubt, almost all alternative medicine is junk science. That would include widespread practices like acupuncture, which the biomedical literature has shown convincingly confers no real medical benefits compared to placebo.

But the placebo effect is powerful. It is far more than the "power of positive thinking." Instead, the placebo effect has real, measurable effects on the human body. Therefore, even if a "treatment" is nothing more than a placebo, some people undoubtedly will benefit from using it.

However, that raises a serious ethical question: Should...

The Cleveland Clinic is held in extremely high regard. If there was an Ivy League of hospitals, the Cleveland Clinic would be in it. At about this time last year, however, the scientific community's faith in the Cleveland Clinic was shaken.

In an article aptly titled "The Fool at the Cleveland Clinic," Dr. Josh Bloom detailed the pseudoscientific ramblings of a doctor named Daniel Neides. Dr. Neides had written a blog post about how to avoid "toxins" and "chemicals," buzzwords used by alternative medicine practitioners and peddlers of pseudoscience. But that was hardly the worst part.

Dr. Neides also parroted anti-vaccine propaganda. As Dr. Julianna LeMieux...

Orrin Hatch, a Republican Senator from Utah, has announced his retirement. When he leaves, the Senate will lose its most ardent supporter of alternative medicine.

Previously, that title was held indisputably by Tom Harkin, a Democratic Senator from Iowa. He is largely to blame for the abomination known as the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), an organization so worthless that it had to change its name so biomedical scientists would stop mocking it.

If Ted Kennedy was the Lion of the Senate, Sen. Harkin was the Snake Oil Salesman of the Senate. Given that his pet project wasted billions investigating pure...

Open displays of bipartisanship are rare these days and, as such, should be applauded. Unfortunately, a recent example of bipartisanship promotes junk science and bogus health claims.

In a press release, Democratic Congressman Jared Polis and Republican Congressman Mike Coffman announced their intention to launch the Integrative Health and Wellness Caucus. That sounds nice, until you realize that "integrative" and "wellness" are code words for "alternative medicine."

However, as we've said multiple times, there's no such thing as alternative medicine. If alternative medicine worked, it would just be called medicine. In other words, a patient has two choices: evidence-based...