alternative medicine

Lemons can enhance the taste of tea, a cup of which that may soothe your cold or ease congestion. But lemons certainly can't prevent or cure disease, especially cancer. So let's not boil lemon water and skip the specialist – as some social media activists are advocating – if you've been diagnosed with this serious ailment.
It is easy to see why so many people believe in traditional herbal remedies. Homeopathy, on the other hand, is just plain nuts. It completely defies logic how anyone with a halfway functional brain could buy into this. This type of alternative medicine is predicated upon three truly bizarre ideas.
Surely Pfizer wouldn't mind if you took a closer look at what's listed on its label for Centrum Silver Men, which is marketed to men age 50+, right? Copper sulfate: Pesticide. Silicon dioxide. Glass. Titanium dioxide. Paint. But the biggest dirty little secret about multivitamins is that few people actually need dietary supplements.
"Natural is better." That pervasive and pernicious myth, despite being soundly refuted by things like arsenic and hemlock and rattlesnake venom, has become a mainstay in 21st Century conventional wisdom. Who needs Western medicine when the Chinese have been eating and boiling weeds for 3,000 years?
Homeopathy is the system of using extremely dilute solutions of the disease-causing entity itself to treat the disease.
Herb popular in China for knee arthritis failed to surpass placebo effect in randomized trial. Many OA patients will remain unconvinced, however, and stick with the soothing belief in its efficacy, as have generations gone by, science notwithstanding.
The insanity that is evident from examining the role (or lack thereof) of the FDA in regulating alternative remedies may be finally coming to a head. It s about time.
The latest in health news: The FDA is finally reviewing homeopathic products to decide whether they should go under same approval process as conventional drugs, a new study shows why napping in carseats and strollers could be dangerous for your infant, and Columbia faculty speak out for or against Dr. Oz; we aren't sure.
Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a warning to consumers and pharmacies not to rely on over-the-counter asthma products labeled as homeopathic. In their alert, they write:
InScreen Shot 2015-03-11 at 2.01.10 PM the end, it was a complete waste of time and money. Yet, the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), Australia's top agency for medical research has concluded that
In the wake of the measles resurgence, public health officials are warning against the use of ineffective homeopathic vaccine alternatives, saying they should be taken off the market.
In our perpetual more of the same list, yet another study should help throw an extra shovel of dirt on a longstanding fad antioxidants, this time vitamins C and E. Perhaps the darlings of the supplement world (at least today), antioxidants have been touted as useful for pretty much everything from preventing aging and cancer to getting better gas mileage for your SUV.