alternative medicine

The latest in health news: The FDA is finally reviewing homeopathic products to decide whether they should go under same approval process as conventional drugs, a new study shows why napping in carseats and strollers could be dangerous for your infant, and Columbia faculty speak out for or against Dr. Oz; we aren't sure.
Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a warning to consumers and pharmacies not to rely on over-the-counter asthma products labeled as homeopathic. In their alert, they write:
InScreen Shot 2015-03-11 at 2.01.10 PM the end, it was a complete waste of time and money. Yet, the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), Australia's top agency for medical research has concluded that
In the wake of the measles resurgence, public health officials are warning against the use of ineffective homeopathic vaccine alternatives, saying they should be taken off the market.
In our perpetual more of the same list, yet another study should help throw an extra shovel of dirt on a longstanding fad antioxidants, this time vitamins C and E. Perhaps the darlings of the supplement world (at least today), antioxidants have been touted as useful for pretty much everything from preventing aging and cancer to getting better gas mileage for your SUV.
As we have done repeatedly, fellow debunker Michael Shaw has some things to say about Dr. Oz on his web page Shaw s Eco-Logic. Here are a couple of examples from his piece The Merry Old Land of Oz, which appeared on the HealthNewsDigest site:
As if parents with autistic children don t have enough to worry about, there are a number of vultures out there who are all too willing to take advantage of these parents by selling treatments that are ineffective and dangerous, according to a report by the FDA.
What is complementary-alternative medicine anyway? Alternative to what? If a practice is not science-based, it is not medicine. Now we learn that Cleveland Clinic has sold out this concept for herbal treatments. Sad.
Currently, there are no FDA-approved medical treatments for autism spectrum disorders (ASD), characterized mainly by difficulties with social interaction and communication, repetitive behaviors and
We ve written about alternative medicine in the past, mainly pointing to the fact that there s no such thing as alternative medicine, only real medicine and fake medicine. And alternative medicine largely falls into the latter category there have been no studies showing that these