BPA

Anti-chemical and environmental groups must be in a reactive mood today. One of their meal tickets, BPA a component of polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins which has been used for decades, most commonly as a sealant/liner for canned foods, has quietly been removed from the EPA list of chemicals of concern.
Top health stories: A shout out to the brilliant Trevor Butterworth and his take on the BPA scare, why you shouldn't run off to the nearest vitamin store before reading our take on Glucosamine, and the real uses and mis-uses, for the Body Mass Index (BMI).
Behavioral economists Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky described cognitive errors and pitfalls that affect our ability to gauge the probability of even simple events. And these errors
At ACSH we shout a lot. Sometimes even at each other. But most of the time it takes the form of shoutouts to like-minded writers and websites (and there aren t
Wisconsin Representative Chris Taylor (D) has introduced Assembly Bill 607, requiring manufacturers to label food containers that contain BPA. Despite the fact that BPA has been used for
Here we go again. Mixing science with politics. We all know how well that works. Yet, Paul Joseph Watson, writing on Infowars.com manages to do just this with a side order of chemical scares tossed in, and the result is predicable a big mess.
For years, various environmental and academic groups have been desperately trying to explain how it can be that high doses of chemicals (a common target: bisphenol-A, BPA), referred to as
If you follow BPA (bisphenol-A) on your Google news alert, no one would blame you for being surprised that you actually woke up the next morning. BPA, which is reacted with another chemical to form ubiquitous polycarbonate plastics, and also used as is on cash register receipts, may be the most studied substance ever, which is especially ironic, since no one has ever found any evidence of an adverse effect on human health.
The BPA-cancer link is making headlines again. This time, researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago claim that
Julie Gunlock, the director of the Independent Women s Forum Culture of Alarmism Project, has written a new book, From Cupcakes to Chemicals: How the Culture of Alarmism Makes
We at ACSH are rarely surprised by anything we see published. Since it is our job to debunk bad science, we get a steady diet of it. But we got a special dessert dropped in our laps, and this one takes the cake. Although the study in question is from July, it is so jaw-droppingly awful that we decided to include it today. And when you read it, you may want to discontinue your subscription to Scientific American, which according to ACSH s media director Erik Lief should really be called Unscientific American.
A couple of weeks ago, we pointed out that a report that BPA increases the risk of miscarriage in high-risk women was baseless. Now a cogent article in Forbes magazine carries the message even further.