BPA

A recent study examining the association between prenatal BPA exposure and lung function has been making headlines, often with titles similar to BPA linked to asthma. However, the actual study is about as
The NYTimes Well blog tries, again, to scare women about bogeymen toxic chemicals. Another Deborah Blum special, based on zero science and plenty of hype and half-truths (if that much).
Regular Dispatch readers will know that we have discussed BPA perhaps the poster child of the anti chemical movement until we are blue in the face (BTF?). So, it is always nice to know that there are others out there who really understand this topic and agree with us scientifically.
If you re looking for an example of the absurdity of what happens when activist groups stick their noses in areas that are way above their pay grade, look no further. It doesn t get any better than this.
Of all the garbage science topics that we routinely cover, among the worst is the concept that miniscule amounts of so-called endocrine disruptors chemicals that supposedly have an adverse impact on human sexual development do anything whatsoever. The plastic component BPA and plastic softeners, phthalates, are the two poster children of the movement, but there are many more.
Earlier this month, Democratic Senator Ed Markey of Massachusetts introduced a bill that would ban BPA from food and beverage containers cleverly titled the Ban Poisonous Additives Act of 2014.
He s back at it again. Democratic Senator Ed Markey of Massachusetts (along with two of his acolytes in the House) is now introducing a bill that would ban BPA
Survey says: the overwhelming majority of Ob-Gyns don t discuss toxic chemicals with moms-to-be. The activists spin: Most Ob docs are not up on these risks. Really? Maybe not as up as EWG!
Kudos to Health Canada (the Canadian equivalent of our FDA) in spite of the fact that Canada was the first country in the world to basically prohibit the use of BPA (bisphenol A) in baby bottles, they continued to do due diligence on the substance.
The Harvard School of Public Health in collaboration with the Silent Spring Institute (yes, you guessed it, named after the infamous environmentalist Rachel Carson), just released a list of 102 chemicals as
Is there anything these days that doesn t get politicized? It would seem not, since the chemical BPA is the latest culprit An op-ed by Merrill Matthews in Investors.com, the online blog of Investors Business Daily would seem to say no. The piece entitled Left Wants EPA To Ban Chemical FDA Says Isn't Harmful describes how a common and harmless chemical bisphenol A, aka BPA has turned into a political rallying point for groups that have nothing better to do than to try to ban it. They may be misguided, but at least you have to give them points for determination.
The always dead-on Trevor Butterworth once again hit the bullseye in his op-ed in Forbes.com. And in his unique way, he makes the perennial critics of BPA a component of the plastic that seals canned foods look rather foolish.