diet

Acai breakfast bowls are available in nearly every trendy smoothie and juice bar. But if you haven’t indulged in this particular "superfood" fad yet, you haven’t missed out. Turns out acai bowls don’t actually provide a healthy start to the day after all. That's because they're nutritionally equivalent to three bowls of Froot Loops.
A new study looks at how the American diet has changed after 17 years of cajoling. It's time to begin thinking outside the box -- pizza or otherwise.
A small, but intriguing study suggests that ultra-processed designer foods are both calorie dense and eaten more quickly. That's a perfect combination for gaining weight.
Certain foods, due to their effect on blood sugar levels, precipitate the release of molecules which are associated with inflammation. Excessive consumption of refined carbohydrates, french fries or soda isn't going to trigger that response. While those who eat this way may have significant negative health issues, it won't be due to so-called “inflammatory” foods. To suggest so is junk-science and a lack of common sense.
There are reports that as little as one piece of bacon a day will increase your risk of colon and rectal cancer. A closer look at the study suggests that while bacon is certainly a risk factor in being a pig, its impact on humans may not be as great as the media claims.
The maker of Keto Breads, allegedly "the world's healthiest bread," claims that all the other bread out there causes autoimmune disease and leaky gut syndrome. The former claim is risible and the latter is "not a recognized medical diagnosis."
Americans seem to be consuming less sugar, because we are consuming fewer calories. Can labeling that notes "added sugars" bend the curve even more?
Can an algorithm prescribe a healthier diet? The short answer: Just a little better than the flip of a coin, or that printed diet you found on the Internet.
Reductionism is the basis for most science. Since so many factors can be involved, isolating them in a lab-bench experiment can yield valuable insights. For epidemiological studies, it doesn’t work as well.
A recent study shed light on something we've known for some time, but haven't quite lived by: Eating slowly could curb weight gain. Here's why this makes sense. 
If you want to lose weight – excluding all fad diets – how should you eat? A new study suggests that it's more effective to choose foods with lower calories than to try to simply eat less of everything.
The uber-restrictive nature of the power couple's diet, along with his claim that he never cheats (deflated footballs aside) is, like all things Brady, a bit super human. Now, an online meal delivery service has teamed with the QB to help you achieve top athletic performance – or to deliver gingered amaranth greens for your TV-game viewing.