diet

There are reports that as little as one piece of bacon a day will increase your risk of colon and rectal cancer. A closer look at the study suggests that while bacon is certainly a risk factor in being a pig, its impact on humans may not be as great as the media claims.
The maker of Keto Breads, allegedly "the world's healthiest bread," claims that all the other bread out there causes autoimmune disease and leaky gut syndrome. The former claim is risible and the latter is "not a recognized medical diagnosis."
Americans seem to be consuming less sugar, because we are consuming fewer calories. Can labeling that notes "added sugars" bend the curve even more?
Can an algorithm prescribe a healthier diet? The short answer: Just a little better than the flip of a coin, or that printed diet you found on the Internet.
Reductionism is the basis for most science. Since so many factors can be involved, isolating them in a lab-bench experiment can yield valuable insights. For epidemiological studies, it doesn’t work as well.
A recent study shed light on something we've known for some time, but haven't quite lived by: Eating slowly could curb weight gain. Here's why this makes sense. 
If you want to lose weight – excluding all fad diets – how should you eat? A new study suggests that it's more effective to choose foods with lower calories than to try to simply eat less of everything.
The uber-restrictive nature of the power couple's diet, along with his claim that he never cheats (deflated footballs aside) is, like all things Brady, a bit super human. Now, an online meal delivery service has teamed with the QB to help you achieve top athletic performance – or to deliver gingered amaranth greens for your TV-game viewing.
Soda taxes aren't racist, yet precisely that case was made by a reporter for the newspaper. His position: Blacks and Hispanics consume more sugary beverages than whites and Asians, while whites and Asians drink more diet beverages than blacks and Hispanics. Because the tax does not apply to diet beverages, it is racist. Let's break this down.
Food and nutrition companies always capitalize on whatever fad diets are currently in fashion to shamelessly promote their products. Science is usually of secondary concern. Now, Nestlé wants in on the action, promoting an alleged nutritional drink, claiming that it's low in FODMAPs. Huh? What are those?
Outside of the Western world, insect consumption is common. The Chinese, for instance, will eat just about anything that crawls on six (or more) legs. Centipedes and fried scorpions appear on the menu. Not only is entomophagy widespread, it's also probably healthier for people -- and the planet -- than eating other animals.
Too many raisins will kill you, too.
A closer look at food science reveals that a tax on sugary drinks (such as soda, sports drinks, and tea), a policy being pondered by voters in the San Francisco Bay area, is deeply misguided. We get sugar in our diets from many different sources, some of which we would consider "healthy" foods.