Dr. Oz

Dr. Oz is what would happen if Alex Jones and Mother Jones had a baby. And perhaps short of murdering somebody on live TV, there is literally nothing Dr. Oz won't say or do for money.
In a move steeped in nonsense, Dr. Mehmet Oz has been appointed by Donald Trump to the President's Council on Sport, Fitness and Nutrition. Since his views on health and medicine are so lacking in scientific evidence, we have no idea why anyone is still listening to him at all anymore. 
With my old friend  Dr. Oz squarely within the virtual anus of the intestinal machinations of some most recent news cycles, I just can't resist focusing on him again. Here's some really terrible art I've created over the years.
Dr. Oz is a fraud who ought to be fired from Columbia University and have his medical license revoked. Instead, he's headed to the White House.
The 1,500th episode of The Dr. Oz Show recently aired, or in TV parlance it's now "in the can." And after peddling suspect science for nine years, that's basically where this show belongs. Ratings are tanking, his audience is yawning – and we hardly noticed his tired milestone. Our medical advice: Oz = Irrelevance.  
His message that some fruit will cure anxiety is nothing new for Dr. Oz. This medical hoodwinker has been this preaching this nonsense for years. A post from his website listed "7 Anxiety-Fighting Foods You Have to Try." It's just another dopey Dr. Oz oversimplification of a serious, complex issue.
Apparently, you can make any claim with an Asterisk (*), so long as the asterisk clarifies that your claim isn't true. In one of Dr. Oz's latest press releases, the TV 'doc' touts apple cider vinegar (or any vinegar) as a miracle health benefit: it improves blood flow, prevents diabetes, encourages weight loss, and prevents cancer. But not too long ago on the Dr. Oz show, he caveats his claims by saying this: "
The Dr. Oz Show averaged 3.8 million viewers in 2012, but viewership plummeted to 1.8 million for the season that ended in May. We're halfway there, people. Only 1.8 million to go!
When I was 17 years old I had every place kicker s nightmare: ingrown toenails. Worse was that I ignored the problem for too long and had to have them professionally removed. My pediatrician referred me to a local podiatrist and I left school early one day to get my toes clipped.
Another group of serious doctors calls for the television kind to be regulated.
After six years on the air, Dr. Oz says he s making some changes to his popular TV show, viewed daily by millions. Following the media firestorm from that letter from physicians across the country, Oz has now admitted publicly he was wrong to endorse so many miracle weight loss pills. Most recently, he announced the addition of Dr. Michael Crupain to his staff. His duties would include (according to the press release) being
This week in health news: Oprah Network pulls the plug on the Dr. Oz radio show, the European Commission says sick cattle to be treated with homeopathy, and the FDA takes a closer look at the efficacy of antimicrobial soaps and hand sanitizers