EWG

If there is a better example of what happens when junk science meets reality, good luck finding it. Look no further than today s New York Times article about how a misguided attempt to solve a non-problem turned into a real problem.
We at ACSH operate on a tight budget, but somehow managed to scrape up enough money to buy our good friends over at the Environmental Working Group an oversized beach umbrella. It would seem that they have been out in the sun too long, and are not thinking especially clearly about a summertime issue: How to protect yourself from getting too much sun.
The latest in health news: EWG's Dirty Dozen more like Dummy Dozen, measuring kids' medicine inaccurately lands many in the ER, and buying breast milk online could be dangerous!
Yawn. It s that time of year again. Perhaps for the lack of anything better to do, Ken Cook and his Environmental Working Group (EWG) merry men (and women) are celebrating World Let s Promote Ignorance Day, thanks to their annual Dirty Dozen list.
According to a report in the New York Times, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) has released its latest masterpiece of misdirection an 80,000 item database of foods that purports to help consumers decide which foods are most healthful.
Survey says: the overwhelming majority of Ob-Gyns don t discuss toxic chemicals with moms-to-be. The activists spin: Most Ob docs are not up on these risks. Really? Maybe not as up as EWG!
We were rather perturbed to see a piece by Julie Revelant on FoxNews.com this week called 10 Ways to Rid Your Body of Toxic Chemicals.
Melinda Wenner Moyer, a science writer and mother, curious about whether it was really necessary to feed her son organic instead of conventional produce took matters into her own hands and did research
This is what happens when you let your health advice column be taken over by an environmental writer. This week s Science section of the New York Times included an advisory about