GMOs

The initial promise of agricultural GMOs was to breed better crops more efficiently than we had been doing through techniques like selective breeding, mutagenesis and radiation. These are all relatively clumsy and inefficient. Genetic engineering allows us to do what we have been doing since the dawn of agriculture: improve our crops in a more directed and specific way that only affects a couple of genes. The development of GMOs was never about helping Monsanto sell more Roundup. It was about efficiently engineering crops to be able to grow and flourish on undesirable land, as well as, in many cases, improving their nutritional characteristics.
What excuse to be anti-science will environmental groups use now that they can no longer claim it's about corporations? Monsanto's early patents on GMOs have started to expire.
In the early 1990s, Gary Hirshberg, chairman and former president and CEO of Stonyfield Farm, was a leader of the nascent corporate responsibility movement .....But now, Hirshberg has deserted evidence-based science in his support of mandatory labeling of GMO foods
A non-scientist thinks he has discovered that GMOs contain formaldehyde.
On Thursday, the US House of Representatives passed the Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act of 2015 a bill that would ban states from requiring labels for all genetically modified foods. The bill passed by a vote of 275 to 150.
A protein called RaxX may help create more disease-resistant rice varieties and block microbial infections in both plants and animals.
Today, July 20th, 2015 marks the 46th anniversary of the first manned mission to the moon. For most, today commemorates an amazing achievement that blended innovation, American ingenuity and most importantly science.
Here s a hot investment tip: buy shares in Blockbuster. As many as you can afford. Put in all of Johnny s and Jill s college funds. A wave of nostalgia is bringing VHS back. Are you going to do it? Do you trust me?
An informative Washington Examiner article by T. Becket Adams hits the nail on the head in explaining the major problem plaguing science that ACSH has worked to combat: junk studies, and the sloppy media coverage that ensues. The piece also includes quotes from many experts associated with ACSH.
The Green Revolution, pioneered by Dr. Norman Borlaug, a co-founder of ACSH and a Nobel Peace Prize laureate, is credited with saving perhaps a billion people from starvation. India was a prime beneficiary of increased crop yields in the 1960s. Now a second green revolution is needed there.
Last November, Maui voters through a ballot initiative passed a ban on the cultivation of genetically engineered crops.
While a field trial of genetically-modified wheat failed to reach its goal (of repelling destructive aphids), the progress made in incorporating relevant genetic traits into the wheat genome will yield more information for better outcomes later.