GMOs

If it were not so deadly serious, it would be rather amusing to see arguments over the latest approval of a genetically engineered crop potatoes by the USDA.
Despite a plethora of studies over the past two decades providing evidence that GMO (also known as genetically-engineered or biotech) foods are just as safe as conventional foods, along with confirmation from American Association for the Advancement of Science, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the United States Department of
Last week, we discussed the infamous Food Boob s opinions regarding what kind of chocolate you should eat because some is toxic. Of course, the only kind of chocolate you
Dr. Robert Fraley, a top researcher at Monsanto, was recently quoted in a Nebraska Radio Network article, stating that he believed that those opposing GMOs are extreme voices and that most people are in the middle. Dr. Fraley, who is often referred to as the father of agricultural biotechnology, according to
California s Proposition 37 and Washington s Initiative 522 previously failed at the ballot box, and now Oregon and Colorado will soon be voting on their own GMO-labeling laws Oregon s Measure 92, and Colorado s Initiative 105.
In an opinion piece published in today s Wall Street Journal, Dr. Henry I. Miller, Robert Wesson Fellow in Scientific Philosophy and Public Policy at Stanford s Hoover Institution and former ACSH trustee, discusses the significant benefit that biopharming can provide for the development of medicines if only regulators can become more tolerant.
Last December, Hawaii County passed a bill that banned biotech companies from the Big Island and prohibited all new genetically modified crops.
California s drought has many impacts especially on agriculture. As Dr. Henry Miller, a physician and molecular biologist, research fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution (and former ACSH Trustee) points out, the anti-GMO crowd is making the situation worse.
In addition to selling about everything you can think of under the sun in bulk quantities, COSTCO is now putting its two cents
Genetically-engineered (biotech, GMO) crops are increasingly being utilized by farmers worldwide, with major benefits to them, and to consumers as well. One crop not being so developed: GMO wheat. Why is there none planted nor on the horizon?
A new survey of 1,000 adults finds widespread agreement with the FDA s position on (not) labeling food with GMO ingredients. It seems anti-biotech activists are just louder than everyone else but the public isn t buying it. Good for them.
We guess it would be too much to hope for: finding two sound-science-based stories in the New York Times on the same day. While one did alert readers to a widely circulated weight-loss scam, the writer of a Health column, of all things, went out of her way to disseminate specious concerns about GMO ingredients in food as a platform for endorsingGMO-labeling