heart failure

Bundled payments, paying one fee for hospitalization and the next 90 days of care, reduces the cost of surgical care. But for a medical hospitalization there's no evidence of cost savings. Why?
Reductionism is the basis for most science. Since so many factors can be involved, isolating them in a lab-bench experiment can yield valuable insights. For epidemiological studies, it doesn’t work as well.
Heart disease is the leading cause of death in women. To learn why, along with how best to prevent it and to clarify any misperceptions about the dynamic nature of the female cardiovascular system ... 
Finally, a study where espousing the thought -- If you cared about my heart and well-being, then you wouldn’t stress me -- could be a win-win. Can anger trigger a heart attack? How about intense physical activity? Here's a closer look at heart health and heartbreak.  
A new report by the Centers for Disease Control reveals that the number of heart-failure-related deaths is on the rise, in contrast to the slow, steady decline seen for over a decade. Another key finding was that the death rate was higher for blacks than for whites or Hispanics.
Sodium restriction has been used to help treat heart failure for many years. But new data suggest that the strategy may not be effective in preventing either additional hospitalizations or death. Could it be that salt isn't the villain we've come to think it is?
A new study from a respected Swedish institute tries to implicate sweetened drinks as a cause for heart failure. But even a cursory review shows that the conclusion is utter nonsense. As it turns out, what these researchers really provided was an opportunity for us all to see what a very flawed study looks like.
A newly-approved Novartis drug combination showed impressive efficacy in reducing cardiac death and morbidity from congestive heart failure, one of the most common ailments taking the lives and health of America s senior population.
n one of the longest studies of the cardiac effects of alcohol (the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities or ARIC study), Dr. Alexandra Gonçalves of the Brigham and Women s Hospital and colleagues examined data from nearly 15,000 participants.
Catch the latest health news: The diet wars continue- low-carb v. low-fat, is either superior? A novel heart failure drug gets the thumbs up, plus why surgery for meniscal tear due to osteoarthritis may not be your first option
A new drug combination appears to reduce the toll of heart failure by almost one-fifth. Some caveats warrant attention, but for such a common, lethal condition, this therapy may change the standard of care if confirmed.
A commonly-used heart drug, digoxin, has never passed a controlled-study test to see if it s both safe and effective for patients with atrial fibrillation. A large VA retrospective analysis shows that it may be even riskier than suspected: maybe time for it to go.