milk

One of ACSH's missions is to change the media narrative about science and health. Too often, the media publishes "click bait" with the intention of scaring people or promoting a new food fad. That does a disservice to the public. We aim to rectify this by getting quoted in as many media outlets as possible, and here's where we appeared recently.
Bloomberg's recent hit piece on milk touches upon almost every sensitive issue that worries parents: food, school and their children. Toss in a conspiracy theory about "Big Dairy," and that's how Bloomberg came up with a fear-mongering headline, complete with a disgusting photo that is supposed to make readers feel queasy.
It is very tempting to purposefully mislabel a product if you can make extra money and get away with it. But, using isotope analysis, chemists have devised a way to discriminate conventional and organic milk.
In a world of food fads, dairy milk is old news. Even though it's not currently considered a "superfood" the farm-based beverage is just as healthy as it always was. So drink up!
Texans who drank raw milk from a dairy near Fort Worth could be at risk of developing brucellosis — a bacterial infection that can have multiple deleterious effects. Raw milk is not better than pasteurized milk in terms of nutrition, and certainly not in terms of safety!  
Avoiding cows' milk in favor of plant-based substitutes (e.g. rice, soy or almond "milks") has been part of the vegan lifestyle for years. And now, the popularity of such substitutes has been increasing.  According to a recent study, it might mean less growth in kids fed these "milks".
A growing number of parents choose to opt out of giving children their daily dose of milk, and switching to alternatives like almond milk or cashew milk. Perhaps they may think the alternatives offer a bit more calcium than real milk — but this is misleading: Real milk contains both calcium and vitamin D (added in the 1930s due to Rickets — a vitamin D deficiency among children), and the presence of vitamin D helps absorb the calcium. 
Consumption of milk and other dairy products has been variously linked to a host of ills — especially by animal rights groups that want us all to avoid any animal products. Here's an example of the type of questionable data such groups often use to hoodwink unwary consumers.
Vitamin D is crucial for normal growth and development, and in North America much of a child's vitamin D comes from fortified dairy milk. Parents have been advised to give their children reduced fat rather than whole milk — supposedly to decrease the risk of obesity. A new report by Canadian researchers indicates that this advice just might be counterproductive — especially when it comes to vitamin D absorption, and even to obesity.
Cow's milk allergies
In an effort to understand how cow's milk allergies (CMA) form, an interdisciplinary team of scientists investigated if there's a link between certain kinds of sugars found in a mother's breast milk and the presence of CMA in her infant.
Before you go all science on us, let's be clear: We're not advocating you stop drinking something because you can't spell it. In fact, we are saying just the opposite. If we lived by that mantra, we would dehydrate, since we'd have to forgo Dihydrogen Monoxide (water, duh.)
For those of us interested in nutrition, the topic keeps coming up: What food or foods are essential for human health? For example, do we really need to drink milk? The answers to these and other questions might surprise you.