parenting

New research analyzed the rate of foreign-body ingestion in young children, only to determine it increased by over 90% over the study’s 21-year period. Though the items and circumstances vary, no age is spared. And preventable injury is quite costly.
Expectant parents are bombarded with costly propositions. Diverting attention to all the "what ifs" can be distracting, as compared to "what actually is." Storing their infant's cord blood can be preoccupying. But is it worth it?
The fact that Ethan Lindenberger is over 18 years of age cannot be glossed over here. When dealing with minors -- which this teen by legal definition is not -- the terrain can get murky.  
Though Hollywood features can be quite dramatic, the real thing can provide much more entertainment.
Dismissing this encounter as that of another entitled teen ignores a major societal problem that needs fixing.
The knowledge of a baby being big or small is just data, not meaningful information. Context is key.
Branding normal phases of development and transitions have become a thing, mainly to sell books more than identify any new discovery. That said, the first three months of a baby’s life after birth and mom’s postpartum period is a rather unique time for many reasons.
Ideology, not medical reality, has infected much of modern parenting. The most compelling pediatric articles -- centered around misguided activism that still persists -- focused on infant feeding, vaccines and mom-shaming.
By encouraging the avoidance of unpleasant things and equalizing all degrees of suffering, our culture has overcorrected to the point of hampering child development.
Marketing normal development manufactures a problem in need of a solution, which typically appears in the form of an expensive product. As a result, the vulnerability and fears of new parents get most exploited.
It is time to push back over society's chaos-aversion. The price the next generation is paying is too great.
In New Zealand, the Chief Censor adjusted the movie's rating due to "triggering" content. Is this a reasonable health-based decision to protect moviegoers?