parenting

The fact that Ethan Lindenberger is over 18 years of age cannot be glossed over here. When dealing with minors -- which this teen by legal definition is not -- the terrain can get murky.  
Though Hollywood features can be quite dramatic, the real thing can provide much more entertainment.
Dismissing this encounter as that of another entitled teen ignores a major societal problem that needs fixing.
The knowledge of a baby being big or small is just data, not meaningful information. Context is key.
Branding normal phases of development and transitions have become a thing, mainly to sell books more than identify any new discovery. That said, the first three months of a baby’s life after birth and mom’s postpartum period is a rather unique time for many reasons.
Ideology, not medical reality, has infected much of modern parenting. The most compelling pediatric articles -- centered around misguided activism that still persists -- focused on infant feeding, vaccines and mom-shaming.
By encouraging the avoidance of unpleasant things and equalizing all degrees of suffering, our culture has overcorrected to the point of hampering child development.
Marketing normal development manufactures a problem in need of a solution, which typically appears in the form of an expensive product. As a result, the vulnerability and fears of new parents get most exploited.
It is time to push back over society's chaos-aversion. The price the next generation is paying is too great.
In New Zealand, the Chief Censor adjusted the movie's rating due to "triggering" content. Is this a reasonable health-based decision to protect moviegoers?
Ours is a culture that prioritizes instant gratification, and is instinctually reflexive about taking a pill or other fix immediately to end pain. When, actually, it is pain that can in a number of conditions be our greatest gift.
Now, Disney Princesses and films are under attack. We are straying further and further from what most impacts child development, as a source of adult challenges.