parenting

Marketing normal development manufactures a problem in need of a solution, which typically appears in the form of an expensive product. As a result, the vulnerability and fears of new parents get most exploited.
It is time to push back over society's chaos-aversion. The price the next generation is paying is too great.
In New Zealand, the Chief Censor adjusted the movie's rating due to "triggering" content. Is this a reasonable health-based decision to protect moviegoers?
Ours is a culture that prioritizes instant gratification, and is instinctually reflexive about taking a pill or other fix immediately to end pain. When, actually, it is pain that can in a number of conditions be our greatest gift.
Now, Disney Princesses and films are under attack. We are straying further and further from what most impacts child development, as a source of adult challenges.
With continued refrains of "too many" or "too few" being applied to manners of birth, which often serve to shame or assign blame, the focus is on the wrong issue. A new study on delivery mode helps inform us on this topic.
Just because something is documented in a medical chart doesn't make it more accurate. How it's conveyed, and in what context, greatly matters.
Rushing through the seemingly mundane aspects of childhood might not be playing the long game.
Many well-intended efforts that fixate on bias can achieve the unintended consequence of imposing it instead.
It's normal for a baby to be difficult to get to sleep, which is clearly exhausting for new parents. Bu, expensive "sleep consultants" aren't the answer.
When the American Academy of Pediatrics has to issue a report for pediatricians to write a "prescription for play" at every well-visit, our culture is in crisis.
With the release of the CDC's 2018 breastfeeding scorecard, it is time to add common sense into these failed policies that actually supports women and families.