sugar-sweetened beverages

Obviously, we need food labels. We need to know what the product is in that multicolored can or box, and having the information on the nutritional content of the product can be helpful when used appropriately.  But some terms are less clear, and in some cases undefined and/ misleading. For example, ‘All natural’ has no FDA-approved definition, and ‘fresh’ might not be true if an item doesn’t sell quickly. All such labels can generally be termed ‘informational,’ and it’s up to the consumer to interpret them concerning their own needs.

There’s another kind of label on consumer products — the warning label — that we’re all familiar with on cigarette packages and alcohol-containing beverages concerning pregnant women. Some would like to see such labels on foods because of their...

Our consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages has been linked to virtually every illness known to man (only a slight exaggeration) — including obesity and type 2 diabetes — to name just a couple. Thus far it hasn't been blamed for most cancers — but that doesn't mean that people aren't trying to do just that. An example is a recent report in the journal Translational Cancer Research, citing data suggesting that there might be a link between recurrence of some cancers and high sugar consumption, they attempted to determine if cancer survivors had high intakes of sugar from sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). 

The senior author of the report was Dr. Melinda Sothern from LSU Health New Orleans. She and colleagues...