Biomedicine & Biotech

Thanks to a backlash by scientists and journalists, it is no longer acceptable in polite society to be an anti-vaxxer. Not so for anti-GMOers. So we've curated a list of the best anti-anti-GMO memes on the web.
A new, anti-5G "documentary" was created by people who are also "paranormal consultants." That's right, today's real-life Ghostbusters are afraid of iPhones.
Expert societies, especially the infectious disease pharmacists, should consider making recommendations regarding off-label use of antibiotics. These recommendations should be based on clinical, microbiological, and pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic data. 
Given the uncertainty and risk of wrong interpretation, should you have your telomeres measured? Maybe, if the results motivate healthy lifestyle changes. For now, a surer bet for healthy aging would be to spend the money on exercise programs and nutritious foods instead.
Biomedical scientists today stand in a position not dissimilar to that of our ancient ancestors. A thousand years from now, we will be viewed as naïve and of limited means. Yet, it's quite possible that historians of science will look back at the 20th and 21st centuries as periods in which great marvels were accomplished. If there's ever a list called The Seven Wonders of the Biotech World this is what should be on it.
Identifying the cause of an infectious disease is time-consuming and not always easy. So a company called Karius has developed a blood test that analyzes cell-free DNA to identify more than a thousand pathogens.
Get this: 5G activists say that wireless technology causes cancer; cardiovascular disease; DNA damage; learning and memory deficits; impaired sperm function and quality; miscarriage; neurological damage; obesity; diabetes; as well as autism; attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); and asthma in children. That's a pretty scary list. A nuclear bomb can't even do all that.
Two million dollars is a lot of money. It’s enough to buy a fleet of Tesla Model S cars, a large lake’s worth of Swedish Fish or even a private island. One thing this hefty sum won’t get you, however, is a new drug called Zolgensma. But what it does - gene therapy - is astounding.
Roaming through your body is a group of specialized immune cells which act stealthily and authoritatively. They "ask" other body cells to show them identification ("papers please!"). If they fail to provide adequate ID those cells are killed on the spot. No questions asked. Scientists are now recruiting these cells to help in the fight against cancer.
With the hope of increasing accessibility for a burdensome medical issue, can this application actually make a dent as a screening or diagnostic tool?
Promising work just published in the journal Nature Medicine offers hope when antibiotic resistance, in an extremely sick patient, renders limited treatments.
Dr. Henry Miller, a former FDA deputy commissioner, used to be a big fan of the New York Times' coverage of science and medicine. But no longer. He takes issue with an editorial that accuses the agency of reducing its scrutiny of new drugs. Dr. Miller explains why the Times is off-base: the development of precision medicine.