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“My view is that everyone who contributes to the scientific enterprise is a scientist. It’s not just lab work that makes up science. It’s science policy, science communication, scientific illustration, and science education and many other things. In fact, you could make the case that our current struggles aren’t about whether we’re succeeding in the laboratory but rather whether all of the other parts of science are succeeding. Perhaps they would do better if we recognized the participants as science rather than as so-called “alternative careers.”

– Holden Thorp

Holden Thorp has had a stellar career. He was once a scientist, more specifically a chemist, but went on to pursue...

It doesn't take much anything to annoy me anymore. It can strike from anywhere at any time. What was it today? (As if it matters. Two minutes later I would have found something else.) But today it was coffee. Not the coffee, really. It was this:

Just for the record, I'm a big fan of artificial sweeteners. They are safe (1) and help me avoid turning into the fat slob I'm already becoming limit my sugar intake. An added bonus: By using a plant-based product no one can say I'm not doing my part in saving the planet. And let me tell you, I could swear that I felt the global temperature dropping...

The world of IVF has introduced a host of ethical quandaries. For now, Alabamians will be spared the latest, i.e., purchasing tests to assist in genetically designing their future children, as Alabama’s high court has effectively foreclosed the procedure. But the laboratories offering these tests are based in N.J. and California, and it’s likely the world of genetic tourism will prosper.

You can find Part I here.

Testing for genetic diseases before embryo implantation is not new. It is conventionally done in tandem with IVF to deselect embryos with Mendelian diseases or those with abnormalities that preclude a successful pregnancy. Testing for...

“Voyager has grown old. It was never designed for this! Its original mission was supposed to last a bit over three years. Voyager has turned out to be much tougher than anyone ever imagined, but time gets us all. Its power source is a generator full of radioactive isotopes, and those are gradually decaying into inert lead. Year by year, the energy declines, the power levels relentlessly fall. Year by year, NASA has been switching off Voyager’s instruments to conserve that dwindling flicker. They turned off its internal heater a few years ago, and they thought that might be the end. But those 1970s engineers built to last, and the circuitry and the valves kept working even as the temperature dropped down, down, colder than dry ice, colder...

Join Cameron English and Dr. Chuck Dinerstein on Episode 64 of the Science Dispatch podcast as they examine the health effects of porn use:

A subset of men is giving up internet porn on the grounds that it's physically and psychologically harmful. Overlooking much of the relevant science, NPR claims this movement promotes "a set of unproven claims" about the benefits of "masturbation abstinence." Let's examine the research NPR chose to ignore.

Listen to the Science Dispatch on...

Urban farms … are typically celebrated for their diversity, low rates of fertilizers and pesticide use, and reduced food transport emissions…[and are] often seen as a hopeful counter to the resource-intensive monoculture model of conventional farms…”

- Emma Bryce, The Anthropocene

A study in Nature Cities attempts to measure the carbon footprint of urban agriculture (UA), pointing out that it is not nearly as green and carbon-reducing as we have fantasized. I’...

What is ARMRA, and who is Sarah Rahal?

ARMRA Colostrum was created by and is run by Sarah Rahal, MD, a pediatric neurologist. She claims to have expertise in environmental and functional medicine. She founded her business, ARMRA, around colostrum products. The inspiration for ARMRA came when,

“Dr. Rahal unearthed the trove of over 5,000 research publications attesting to the powerful health benefits of colostrum, nature’s first bioactive food; yet, remained largely unknown to the masses.”Our Story...

As published in the Lancet, it is expected that by 2050, over 152 million people will be living with dementia. Among these millions, there will be a portion of individuals who, being vulnerable, might resort to unorthodox, not to say fraudulent, therapeutic approaches to delay or 'prevent' cognitive decline — for example, increasing the consumption of grapes or following the advice of...

Join Cameron English, Dr. Chuck Dinerstein and Dr. Barbara Billauer as they examine marijuana's evolving legal status on Episode 63 of the Science Dispatch podcast:

“The Controlled Substances Act (CSA) places all substances that were in some manner regulated under existing federal law into one of five schedules. This placement is based on the substance’s medical use, potential for abuse, and safety or dependence liability.” The FDA has proposed changing the classification of marijuana from a Schedule I to a Schedule III drug. Let’s break down its thinking.

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The Environmental Working Group (EWG) is at it again. Scare tactics with little behind them.

The latest example of EWG’s chicanery was when they put out a recent video about the dangers of a supposedly "new" pesticide called chlormequat aka chlormequat chloride, which is primarily used on oats. EWG simply loves to scare people. Scares = donations.

(EWG also recently published a paper on chlormequat chloride. I will be reviewing this soon.)

Meanwhile, let's see if we can't pick out a trick or two from the video. The following are screenshots from the video using the closed caption function.

Trick #1

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