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"Do I Dare to Eat an Egg?"

That question was the title of a recent health newsletter article and reflects the public's profound "ovophobia."

Egg use in the U.S. has fallen dramatically over the last 50 years, from 400 eggs per person per year in the 1940's to 235 in 1992, the last year for which statistics are available. The main reason for the decline: fear that eggs, which are high in cholesterol, will increase the risk of heart disease.

But recent research shows that eggs have gotten a bum rap. The real cholesterol villain in that all-but-extinct fried egg and bacon breakfast is not the cholesterol in the egg but the saturated fat in the bacon (and the bacon grease or butter that the eggs are fried in). Indeed, an egg's impact on the average...

(From Priorities Vol. 8, No. 2, 1996)

FYI: Three Classes of Medical Devices -- Download file devices (download)

Popular magazines Reader s Digest, Good Housekeeping, McCall sand the like used to be America s number-one source of nutrition information. Today, magazines take a back seat to TV; but according to the American Dietetics Association, a solid 39 percent of the American public still gets most of its nutrition news from magazines. Those readers need to know that the information they get from their favorite magazines is both accurate and reliable.

Source Notes:
(From Priorities Vol. 8, No. 2, 1996)

Introduction

by Dr. William London

What public health services are appropriate for government to provide? Do contemporary public health practices intrude unreasonably on personal liberty? And, in trying to protect people from their own "behavioral risk factors," do public health professionals actually contribute to public health problems?

This issue of Priorities explores these questions in a special section-a symposium on Life, Liberty and Public Health. The symposium takes as its starting point Jacob Sullum's provocative essay...

(From Priorities Vol. 8, No. 2, 1996)

Should the FDA Regulate Medical Devices? Yes -- Download file pcp-yes (download)

(from Priorities Vol. 8, No. 2, 1996)

Should the FDA Regulate Medical Devices? No -- Download file pcp-no (download)

(From Priorities Vol. 8, No. 2, 1996)

FYI: What is a Medical Device? -- Download file medical (download)

People burdened with extra body fat know all too well that one size doesn t fit all especially when it comes to weight loss. Many are hoping, though, that today s rapidly progressing research on the genetics of obesity will produce a one-size-fits-all approach to slimming down their bulging curves. But as exciting as this research is, the unfortunate reality is that most overweight people won t be able to squeeze a solution out of it.

Source Notes:
(From Priorities Vol. 8, No. 2, 1996)

By treating risky behavior like a communicable disease, the public health establishment invites government to meddle in our private lives.

In the introduction to the first major American book on public health, U.S. Army surgeon John S. Billings explained the field's concerns: "Whatever can cause, or help to cause, discomfort, pain, sickness, death, vice, or crimeand whatever has a tendency to avert, destroy, or diminish such causesare matters of interest to the sanitarian; and the powers of science and the arts, great as they are, are taxed to the uttermost to afford even an approximate solution to the problems with which he is concerned."

Despite this ambitious...

Why does healthy weight vary so widely for people of the same height? Bone structure has a lot to do with it, as does the type of weight a person carries. Bigger boned people and people with dense muscle mass can safely carry around more weight than can people with large fat deposits.

Source Notes:
(From Priorities Vol. 8, No. 2, 1996)