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Contrary to popular wisdom, mayonnaise in your summer chicken salad is usually not the cause of food poisoning; it is more likely that the source of the problem is improperly handled chicken (undercooked, unrefrigerated, or both). This helpful summer tip is among many collected in a new booklet released today by a panel of scientists from the American Council on Science and Health.

Here are a few more tips:

* Prevent premature aging and reduce your risk of skin cancer by using a good "broad spectrum" sunscreen.
* Choose sunglasses that block 99 to 100 percent of both UVA and UVB radiation.
* Avoid overheating in the summer sun by drinking plenty of liquids and taking breaks in cool places.
* To stay safe while swimming or boating, know your limitations...

Scientists and physicians from the American Council on Science and Health have urged New Jersey Governor Christine Todd Whitman to vigorously promote community water fluoridation in New Jersey. "Fluoridation remains the safest, most effective, and most economic public-health measure to prevent tooth decay and to improve oral health for a lifetime," says ACSH President Dr. Elizabeth Whelan.

Despite overwhelming scientific evidence supporting fluoridation, ignorance and unfounded fears have prevented its adoption in many areas. An astounding 84 percent of New Jersey residents do not receive adequately fluoridated water, while 38 percent of other Americans live in unfluoridated areas.

Water fluoridation is an ideal way of improving dental health and controlling health care...

Scientists associated with the New York City Advisory Council on Health Priorities, a new affiliate of the American Council on Science and Health, have objected to recent claims that the perchloroethlyne, or "perc," emissions from cleaning establishments in residential buildings in New York City are a "health hazard." These claims, made by New York City Public Advocate Mark Green, are unfounded and unnecessarily alarming, say the scientists.

According to ACSH President Dr. Elizabeth Whelan, "There is no public health justification for needlessly frightening New York residents or for imposing a ban that would inflict economic disaster on dry-cleaning establishments."

According to the Science Advisory Board of the Environmental Protection Agency, perc "is an example of a...

Scientists from the American Council on Science and Health confirmed today that the Liggett Group settlement is not the public health victory it appears, contrary to the near-universal positive response from the rest of the public health community.

In an editorial in today's Wall Street Journal, Dr. Elizabeth Whelan, ACSH president, pointed out that a little-known addendum to the Liggett deal ensures that it brings no health gains at all. Rather, it will serve as a fresh coating of legal Teflon for the cigarette company. It may even be the prototype for a coming deal involving the entire industry. It's no wonder that shares of Brooke Group, which owns Liggett, soared after the settlement.

According to the terms of the deal, Liggett will publicly admit to cigarettes'...

Physicians and scientists at the American Council on Science and Health reported today that some much-touted concerns about the safety of commercial baby food are, in fact, unwarranted.

In a newly released booklet, Feeding Baby Safely, the ACSH panel urged parents to forgo unfounded fears and to focus instead on scientifically based practices that ensure the safe feeding of babies and toddlers. The ACSH scientists noted that "either commercial or homemade baby foods can be appropriate and healthful for the infant" and that the "safety and nutritional value [of baby food] depend to a large extent on parents' following safe preparation and handling guidelines."

One common and serious threat to babies' health is bacterial contamination. Because of this danger, the proper...

The American Council on Science and Health (ACSH) today opposed the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)'s proposed changes to ambient air quality standards for ozone and its adoption of a standard for "fine" particulate matter (referred to as "PM2.5"). ACSH President Dr. Elizabeth M. Whelan declared that "there is no public health benefit to be gained from the proposed stricter standards. Furthermore, adoption of the proposed standards will place severe economic burdens on hundreds of counties throughout the U.S. and on U.S. industry burdens that will be passed on in the form of higher costs to consumers without any identifiable benefit in return."

In letters to the EPA, ACSH scientists took issue with the agency's reliance on studies that are inadequate for showing a causal...

Two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning science writer Jon Franklin has spoken out to condemn the scare tactics practiced by today's journalists. In a pulls-no-punches lead story in the latest issue of Priorities, the quarterly magazine of the American Council on Science and Health, Franklin exposes what he terms the "Poisons of the Mind"-those "lies, illusions and poison paranoias" that so often grip our society." ACSH President Dr. Elizabeth M. Whelan has remarked: "Jon Franklin's panoramic essay is therapy for technophobes and a treat for skeptics."

"What we are seeing," Jon Franklin says, "in the press and in our society, is nothing less than the deconstruction of the Enlightenment and its principle institution, which is science."

In "Poisons of the Mind" Franklin exposes...

The American Council on Science and Health (ACSH) has announced the formation of an affiliate group, the New York City Advisory Council on Health Priorities ("Advisory Council"). This affiliate, funded by grants from two private New York City foundations (The Bodman and J. M. Foundations), will focus on public health issues of particular importance to New York City.

ACSH President Dr. Elizabeth M. Whelan noted that "the Advisory Council will take ACSH's traditional role of providing scientifically sound yet accessible information on a wide variety of public health issues." The Advisory Council will monitor health threats (real or perceived) within the five boroughs of New York City and will be available on short notice to provide accurate scientific information to the media,...

Self-appointed protectors of the environment have a long history of advancing their agendas by postulating sinister threats to our children, distorting the views of mainstream science, and dismissing their critics as profit-hungry plunderers of public health. Advocates of more stringent "air quality" standards are keeping up the tradition. If they succeed, we will soon be harnessed with extraordinarily costly new regulations that could harm public health more than improve it.

When air is heavily polluted, human health suffers. Specific episodes throughout this century confirm that pollution can increase respiratory distress and, in some cases, even cause premature death. No argument there.

But we already have extensive air quality legislation in effectnamely, the Clean...

After the Liggett Group announced a settlement last month of the Medicare reimbursement suits brought by 22 states, a press release from the American Cancer Society reflected the near universal response of the public health community: This action "will significantly advance [our] goals for curtailing the death and disease caused by tobacco use." After all, the health advocates argued, not only was Liggett breaking ranks with the industry by admitting that cigarettes cause disease, are addictive, and are peddled to kids, but Liggett was also planning to pay compensatory damages to the states.

Have we all died and gone to smoke-free heaven? Let's get real.

First, we health advocates have a long history of declaring victory over tobacco only to wake up later to find we've...