Harm Reduction

Penetrating traumas take on a unique trajectory. They can be erratic, asymmetrical and variable in depth and extent. So real estate in the body, and good fortune, matter most.
A new study channels Frederick Taylor, father of the “scientific management” of the workforce, bringing a stopwatch into the hospital to report on how physicians -- in this case -- first-year internal medicine residents, spend their day. Spoiler alert: they don't spend it at bedside.
Whether occupationally, recreationally, or induced by a run-of-the-mill activity, ocular issues involving objects is not rare. And the summer is a prime time for things, propelled by the wind, to land in the eye.
The current troubles plaguing the giant airline manufacturer reveal that a greater societal problem. We are increasingly the servant -- rather than the master -- of our technologies.
In the same way second-hand smoke characterized a personal decision in the context of a public health hazard, can a stronger case be made for second-hand alcohol abuse?
One of the most important driving safety tips is to never swerve if an animal jumps in front of your car. Dog, cat, deer, raccoon -- don't swerve. Although it's an extremely natural instinct, it's also potentially deadly. If you swerve, you could hit a tree or an oncoming vehicle. But there's one exception to this general rule.
Many hospitals have been consolidated and merged into networks. They are frequently anchored by a "Big-Name Hospital" found on U.S. News and World Report's "Honor Roll," touted as the best of the best. But does going to a network-affiliated hospital provide the same care?
You don’t have to look very far to find wellness facilities touting this or that intravenous infusion for “detoxification” and “revitalization.” And if that's not troubling enough, as fees increase our skepticism is following suit.
Are dogs really man's best friend? A recent study in JAMA Surgery suggests they are responsible for some hip fractures in the elderly. Is this a new fear (or fake news generated by cats)?
Doing so is becoming increasingly problematic these days, as another person was arrested for practicing medicine without a license. One common aspect among imposters is that they know just enough information to be dangerous. Here's how to separate physician fact from fiction.
The CDC says "tobacco use by youth is rising." If that were to be true, it'd be horrible -- but it's not. Cigarette use is down. The only reason the CDC can make this claim is because the agency considers e-cigarettes and vaping devices -- which only contain nicotine -- to be tobacco products. This is misleading and undermines public health.
Of course, not all causes and manners of death are within our control. Nor should we be so preoccupied with them that we avoid living. But the National Safety Council's annual report proves to be an interesting read, given a 5.3% increase in preventable-injury-related deaths.