Other Science News

In criticizing the journal Science, when it rains it pours.
On this week's menu: Why is it harder to get a Chick-fil-A franchise than to get into Stanford? ... The CVS-Aetna monopoly on pharmaceuticals would put John D. Rockefeller's Standard Oil to shame. ... Wind may not be as green an energy sources as we thought. ... And finally, the genes we share: we are more alike than not.
A man who is not a Liberal at sixteen has no heart; a man who is not a Conservative at sixty has no head. —Benjamin Disraeli [1] How accurate is this statement? A new study provides an answer.
The scientific publishing industry is thoroughly dishonest and corrupt, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the journal Science are now also a part of the problem. Here's a disturbing case in point.
How I went from PhD microbiologist to founding editor of RealClearScience to the Vice President of Scientific Communications at the American Council on Science and Health.
I pitched a column to the journal Science titled, "How I Became a Junk Science Debunker." It was initially accepted and went through two months (and nine rounds) of editing. At the last moment, however, the column was spiked by senior editor Tim Appenzeller (pictured). Why? Because I'm a corporate shill, of course.
Here's what's grabbing our attention this time: Making the perfect cup of coffee ... a scientific basis for the generational transmission of traumatic events ... a book describing the "Forrest Gump" of the early 1800s ... and considering atmospheric gas responsible for an enormous loss of species.
This article is the first of a three-part series adapted from an essay written by Dr. Alex Berezow, which is now archived at Suzzallo Library's Special Collections at the University of Washington. In Part I, he discusses the most famous unsolved problem in mathematics, the Riemann Hypothesis.
Tylenol-stuffed mouse bombs dropped in Guam. Back-seat skeleton drivers, and if you gotta go it might as well be from a yummy cake. And a gratuitous shot at J&J. Here's your Screwball Science News of the Week.
What do you get when you mix a warming climate and criminals? According to a new study, you will get more crime. Should you add that to your list of downside events as our world heats up? Not so fast.
Here's what we have this time: How to fund the scientific enterprise ... Our complicated relationship with nuclear power ... Ways to read and enjoy more ... and an overlooked environmental consequence to legalizing marijuana.
From an American Dental Association publication to Yahoo!, ACSH has been all over the media in recent days! Take a look at what we've been up to.