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Journalism is thoroughly inept and corrupt. The quality of journalism has gotten so bad that I have whittled down my trusted sources to merely a handful. Even then, when it comes to science, these sources often get it wrong.

The reason is two-fold: First, journalists aren't experts in anything. Many of them went to journalism school, which taught them absolutely nothing useful. An editor at The Economist once told me that the newspaper did not hire journalism majors, preferring people who majored in "something real." The craft of journalism can be learned on the job. Besides, as science communicator Mary Mangan once wrote, "Every crank in the crankosphere has either a politics degree or a journalism degree."

Second, too many journalists believe their primary job...

In April, Maryland became the fifth state to ban the use of BPA in children s products. Signed into law on April 13, this latest state regulation is just another casualty in the war against BPA launched by agenda-driven organizations like the Environmental Working Group (EWG).

Prior to enacting the law, EWG was one of the select groups that testified before the Maryland Senate and House of Delegate committees in support of the legislation. People responding to this unscientific manipulation are not aware of the ulterior motives and gains that are being won by the activists as far as publicity and membership, observes ACSH s Dr. Gilbert Ross. This initiative was successful only...

ACSH staffers were pleasantly surprised when they discovered anti-pseudoscience blogger JunkScienceMom s reference to a Hands off my plastic stuff! Facebook site, which reveals some of the various consumer and medical products that would disappear if BPA were banned. This find is very timely, given the recent Health Canada statement that, despite their BPA ban in plastic baby bottles, BPA is in fact safe. ACSH s Jeff Stier noted, This contradiction makes it quite clear that the bans against BPA are not based on science, but on political and activist pressure.

Dr. Margaret Hamburg, the new FDA commissioner, has eagerly joined the debate on how to correct food safety problems. Food safety legislation is something we ve been following closely, says ACSH s Jeff Stier, and there s no doubt that the country needs improvement in food safety. The question is: how do we do it? Some of the proposed provisions are problematic.

One troublesome provision is the country of origin labeling (COOL) program, which would require that the country of origin for all ingredients to be written on the package. The problem with COOL is that foods today have ingredients from lots of different sources that can shift quickly, says Stier, so this is a false way to address a real problem, and it disregards the fact that all food distributed in this country,...

In April, we lauded the FDA for ignoring chemophobic hype when the agency refused to ban the use of bisphenol A (BPA) in food packaging, cans, and other consumer products. Despite activist pressure including a lawsuit by the Natural Resources Defense Council the FDA stuck to its scientific guns and determined that BPA posed no health threats to consumers.

Imagine our disappointment, then, to learn that the FDA yesterday banned BPA from baby bottles and sippy cups a decision that runs counter to the scientific evidence demonstrating that products containing the...

Screen Shot 2014-04-29 at 12.38.34 PMThe always dead-on Trevor Butterworth once again hit the bullseye in his op-ed in Forbes.com. And in his unique way, he makes the perennial critics of BPA a component of the plastic that seals canned foods look rather foolish.

ACSH s Dr. Josh Bloom is in complete agreement: After reading this piece, it would seem rather obvious that the dozens of studies and papers on the...

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports: "Despite months of additional study and a self-imposed timetable, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration likely will not release its ruling Monday on the safety of bisphenol-A."

"The FDA said it would rule on BPA in November, but it doesn't look like that's going to happen," says ACSH's Dr. Elizabeth Whelan. "Of course, the FDA has in previous instances already reviewed BPA extensively and concluded that it doesn't pose a health risk. It's interesting that this showed up in the Sentinel, since they have been on a crusade against BPA for some time."

"They are being fed data by folks at EWG, NRDC, and other so-called 'environmental' groups in order to publicize the activist point of view on the low-dose phenomenon," says ACSH'...

In response to our January 12 Dispatch dissecting a study that implicates BPA in the cause of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), we received commentary from a reader who is an expert in such matters:

This is like déjà vu all over again. The new study is very similar to a 2004 study from Japanese researchers. Along with their cross-sectional design, which makes it impossible to establish cause-effect relationships, another shared flaw is that both measure BPA with an ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) method, a technique used to detect the presence of an antibody or an antigen in a sample. As described in a 2006 paper, the...

In April of this year, the FDA rejected a petition by the Natural Resources Defense Council to ban the use of bisphenol A (BPA) in food packaging. We at ACSH applauded the agency s decision, which was based on a research review finding that normal levels of exposure to this chemical used to protect canned foods from contamination and spoiling do not pose a health risk to humans. So we were more than a little dismayed to see that the latest issue of JAMA features a study linking BPA to obesity in children and...

The EPA has added BPA to its list of chemicals of concern and announced an action plan to investigate the chemical s effects on the environment.

It s bad enough that the FDA has waffled on BPA, now all of a sudden the EPA is involved, says ACSH s Dr. Elizabeth Whelan. When you know the science of BPA as we do, and you know there s nothing there, reading these things makes you feel extremely frustrated, even angry. Whether it s part of their mandate or not, the EPA have insinuated themselves into public health issues -- or non-issues, in this case.

The initial argument was that people are drinking out of containers that have BPA in...