AAP

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) just released their 2018 breastfeeding report card. It comes on the heels of  World Breastfeeding Week when the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF-led Global Breastfeeding Collective published their scorecard (see here).

Just like last year, no...

The account of the Virginia-based Red Hen restaurant owner insisting Press Secretary Sarah Sanders leave the premises due to presumed political differences has been playing on a loop of social and mainstream media punditry. This got me thinking about a recent sea change within distinct segments of the medical community when it comes to refusing to allow vaccine-hesitant families as patients at certain practices. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has gone as far as sanctioning pediatricians kicking them out of a practice by making it official policy that this action can be used as an absolute last resort (see...

A multidisciplinary team from Texas just published their work in PLOS Medicine on U.S. vaccination rates in children, specifically focusing on nonmedical exemptions (NMEs) in states and counties. With 72.2% of those 19 to 35 months of age fully vaccinated nationwide, the researchers sought to determine the impact of parental concerns over safety and efficacy in opt out rates due to religious and philosophical beliefs. Their analysis of data was based on the 18 states that allow more nonspecific, philosophical-belief NMEs that can include religious objections.

What did they discover?

         As summarized from...

Though the current buzzword in healthcare is “patient-centered,” it appears our “thought leaders” instead tend to subscribe to more paternalistic endeavors to control – oops! I mean steward - behavior. Look no further than the debacle of how forced, mandatory electronic medical records were implemented and the havoc that continues to cause (see here) or the American Academy of Pediatrics’ (AAP) recent strategy to make it okay for doctors, as a last resort, to refuse allowing families who decline vaccination to be a part of their practice.

A just published opinion...

Dr. Tim Farnum, anesthesiologist and founder of the nonprofit Parents Against Underage Smartphones (PAUS), is spearheading legislation that proposes a smartphone ban for children under 13 years of age. The proposed law would be a first should it hit the 2018 Colorado ballot as desired— the rate limiting step will be getting 300,000 required signatures of support.

The initiative includes financially punitive along with administrative logistical issues for retailers. It suggests verification by state government of who these businesses are selling to and whether...

I hate politics. Is that enough of a disclosure? Well, I hate erosion of the doctor-patient relationship even more, especially when predicated on politicized falsehoods. So without making a political statement, let's have a medical discussion, and you can let me know your thoughts.

A recent ruling by the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta, Georgia, found the Firearm Owners Privacy Act (FOPA)— enacted in 2011 in Florida— impeded the First Amendment free speech rights of medical professionals. The law sought to preserve Second Amendment rights but thought forbidding physicians to discuss gun ownership with patients was the way to do so. Fines and censure by the state medical board were threatened if doctors were found to be in violation. Ambiguous language didn’t help...

Every year, the recommended childhood and adolescent vaccine schedules are reviewed, adjusted and approved by the following governing bodies:  American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP),  and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).

The 2017 revisions are now published for those 0 to 18 years of age with some of the recent changes listed here—see “notes” section for accessing complete information:

Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine

This vaccine protects against certain strains of the...

The arbitrary nature of many school requirements always baffles me.  Cancel soft pretzel day out of caloric concern, but permit pie bake sales.  Have your doctor independently complete a formal asthma action plan in addition to the entire health form that already covers it; but, not one for other diseases like diabetes, for instance.  

Replace vending machine soda, but sell macaroni and cheese and pizza in the cafeteria.  Offer alternatives to physical education, but be concerned about health and well-being.  Make an entire school nut-free, but don’t teach basic emergency services, first aid and CPR. 

The world isn’t nut free, so arming our communities with essential tools to save lives seems a no-brainer as a requisite component to the formal education system’s mission...