cancer

Some studies are so incredibly stupid, one wonders how they get published in any scientific journal, let alone a prestigious one. And yet, it's happened once again. A new study in JAMA Internal Medicine claims that eating organic food will reduce a person's risk of developing cancer. You got it right: Magic prevents cancer.
Another observational study of organic food, but it is from the French, the culture behind "fine dining." The paper's claims are greater than their proofs. Another paper from a "high impact" journal shedding shade.
The British tabloids are running wild with the story of a 20-year-old woman who had her thumb amputated because of a rare form of cancer. The cause, we are told, was her incessant nail-biting. Believe it or not, this story could very well be true.
Like a broken clock that accidentally gets the time right, California has finally stumbled upon the correct approach to coffee. Sort of. After widespread mockery and condemnation, the Golden State has had an epiphany: Maybe coffee doesn't cause cancer. The FDA agrees.
A dearth of truth in medical advertising is probably our greatest public health threat. With consumers bombarded by spurious claims, our agencies need to be proactive, not reactive in protecting the public.  
Countries that use more pesticides don't have higher rates of pediatric cancer.
A new study claims that artificial sweeteners decrease the risk of cancer recurrence or mortality by more than 20%. This result is intriguing but ultimately unconvincing.
Complementary medicine ranges from authentic stress-relieving massage to well-meaning (but expensive) placebo, to outright spurious healing claims. Researchers decided to study its impact on patients with curable cancers.
polio glioblastoma
Polio, once a global killer, has had its toxic effect on cell's harnessed to treat recurrent glioblastoma with some encouraging results. Does this represent the beginnings of oncolytic virus therapy for cancer?
Cosmic rays are the largest source of radiation exposure associated with flying, and it may have health impacts on flight crews. A new study suggests that the risk of cancer may be increased, but "may" is the operative word. As for the flying public, there should be no concern. 
Humans suffer from "do something syndrome." New research shows that 51% of Americans want to be screened for cancer, even if explicitly told that the cancer screen is completely ineffective.
Given widely-varying belief systems about medicine and health, it shouldn't be surprising that these also exist when it comes to what causes cancer. But surprisingly, cancer belief systems don't significantly impact lifestyle behavior.