CDC

The jury is not out on infant feeding and what is ideal for the baby, yet the desire to pathologize deviating from exclusive breastfeeding or the so-called “perfect” age to start solids is stronger than ever. Now it is the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that is doubling down on creating guidelines for already existing guideline’s guidelines and this pediatrician cannot take it anymore!

The framing of these messages do harm as they tend to be dogmatic and insist on solving problems we really don’t have in our society or at least not to the dramatic degrees they suggest. This unnecessarily pressures and adds stress to parents which detracts from the joy of the experience while erroneously insisting there is one right way to feed a baby.

Such are the...

As tempting as it is, freaking out about most anything -- especially infectious diseases -- tends to render us useless and is not in our best interest. In recent years, Zika and Ebola caused a stir, even a national hysteria. Now, monkeypox has arrived on the media scene.

With a catchy name hearkening back to images of smallpox and its devastation, this animal moniker only makes it all more exotic and worrisome. But, like most infectious agents, informing yourself about its origin, mode of spread and emphasizing proper precautions for disease prevention will allow your concerns to subside.

So, before The Washington Post freaks you out with this...

It’s been an enlightening week in the world of public defecation. Recent video captures of two serial poop-and-run culprits-- respectively deemed “The Mad Pooper” and “Poopman”-- have served to unite communities, corporations, media venues and police forces.  

The Colorado female jogger, dubbed “The Mad Pooper,” who regularly deposits her feces mid-run in one neighborhood and park, despite many restrooms accessible in close proximity, was initially caught by children while in the process of relieving herself. The kids told their...

E-cigarettes are "effective in helping people quit smoking" and "95% safer than smoking."* Additionally, there are "no health risks to bystanders."

What evil, conniving, greedy, Big Tobacco-loving, propaganda-spewing group of shills says that? The UK's National Health Service (NHS).

On its website, the NHS discusses a report issued by Public Health England (another UK government agency) that examined the available evidence on e-cigarettes. The report is unambiguous in...

Dear CDC,

Yesterday a Texan named Tom called our office for some advice about his pain, so the call went to me. I told him I'd be happy to do whatever I could to help him. In retrospect, it was an empty promise.

The conversation was awful. Not only was his story difficult to hear, but the sum total of help I was able to give him was zero. Tom is just one of many collateral casualties of a brutal war against Americans in pain, which was orchestrated by the "Narcotic Nazis" at the CDC. I've read many stories about legitimate pain patients being denied opioid drugs, but it was profoundly upsetting to actually speak with one. Tom appeared to be nothing more than a fine man who did nothing wrong except...

I have repeatedly written about the vital need to stop one-size-fits-all approaches to complicated medical conditions and health policy as well as how important regional nuance is to solving these and more issues like healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). Identifying the unique interactions, behaviors and exposures of a community drives the en vogue "population health" trend from a patient perspective while optimizing the culture, complexity and effectiveness of local institutions and personnel.

So, when I recently attended the Committee on Reducing Infection...

Lyme disease is a nasty one — first, you likely get a rash from a tick bite you never suspected you had. Then, if not treated appropriately, you may get fever and chills, followed by some degree of facial paralysis and arthritis. But a course of the appropriate antibiotic (e.g. doxycycline) should take care of that handily. So what's the deal with supposed chronic Lyme disease? Supposedly people who have been appropriately treated for Lyme continue to have symptoms — "lingering symptoms of fatigue, pain, or joint and muscle aches at the time they finish treatment" — supposedly a condition known to many as chronic Lyme disease. But according to the CDC, these compose  " Post-treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome (PTLDS)," and its...

This morning I attended an event organized by the Committee to Reduce Infection Deaths (RID) at the Harvard Club of New York.

RID's Chairman and Founder as well as former Lt. Governor of New York State Betsy McCaughey, Ph.D. hosted the forum entitled, "CRE and Other High-Mortality Superbugs: How to keep care in our hospitals and nursing homes safe." CRE stands for Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and the emphasis of the presentations and roundtable discussion surrounded CRE and multi-drug resistant organisms (MDROs), in general.

A pool of public health leaders present reflected diverse perspectives on how the complex task of preventing healthcare-associated infections (HAI) needs to be approached. The scope of the...

For pediatricians, it is hard to imagine a week going by without a child accidentally or intentionally ingesting some random substance. The phone calls from concerned parents go something like this: “Umm, he ate the dog’s poop” or “he ate his own poop” or “she ate the dirt from a potted plant.” 

So, news that alcohol-based hand sanitizer made the list of such ingestions by children came as no big surprise. After all, it glistens, oozes, sometimes sparkles and seems to abound in homes, schools, offices, travel gear or key chains these days. 

What is of interest is the fact that the occurrence of such innocent, voluntary or mischievous misdeeds with respect to hand sanitizer happened enough times to warrant the ...

Let’s wax nostalgic. Do you recall the Ebola outbreak a few years ago that brought fear into many American’s lives and ravaged our television screens? Those spacesuit-like outfits medical personnel wore to prevent acquiring the infection were demonstrated by anchors and blasted out via all media forms. The challenge of taking the gear on and off without compromising one’s safety was replayed nearly on a loop.

The messages transmitted then still ring true now regarding the importance of health care worker biohazard protection—not only for themselves, but also the communities they inhabit. In a recent statement put out by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the governing agency revealed...