harm reduction

Substance-abuse counselors helping teens and young adults combat addiction are not prioritizing smoking cessation, according to a new study. This should be improved, given the tragic consequences of smoking in the long-term.
A recent CDC survey of adult behaviors found that more recent quitters, and those who have tried to quit, are using e-cigarettes.
A new study suggests restricting teen access to e-cigarettes leads to a relative increase in youth smoking.
"Harm reduction" is a health-promoting policy, in which self-destructive behaviors are abetted but through measures to reduce abusers harms to their health. Yet our public health establishment stands fiercely opposed to reduced harm products for smokers. Why is that?
Dr. Brad Rodu is a Professor of Medicine at the University of Louisville. He has been an ACSH advisor for many years, and has written or co-written many of our publications on tobacco harm reduction. He was also a member of the ACSH Panel at the American Academy for the Advancement of Science
The New York Times tag-teams e-cigarettes, part of the media crusade orchestrated by the top levels of America s public health and abetted by willing lackeys such as The Times, Matt Myers and ex-FDA head David Kessler.
Conflict of interest at the FDA, Part Deux: The tobacco advisory panel, well-stocked with ideologically devoted anti-harm reduction membership, could not determine that snus is less harmful than smoking. Shame!
Gov. Pence of Indiana just decided to combat an HIV outbreak in a rural county via the harm-reduction tactic of needle exchange. We applaud him, while wondering why he gave the epidemic a 3-month head start?
Reports of a new survey out of the U.K. confirm other studies and surveys which show that use of e-cigarettes and related reduced-harm products among non-smokers is minuscule, and that many smokers have quit by using them.
New international review of studies of e-cigarettes confirms the obvious (to most): these devices offer much less risk to smokers trying to quit than cigarettes, and regulation should be proportionate not prohibitive.
Fifty-three elite scientists published an open letter to the WHO s Director-General, calling upon her to consider the science rather than other influences in the next revision to the global tobacco control treaty. We fear this plea will fall upon deaf ears.
Since the 1960s there has been a highly effective and safe drug to reverse the effects of narcotics (mostly heroin) overdoses. Naloxone (Narcan) is found in every emergency room and if it is administered in time it is almost miraculous. A person who has had a overdose even those who are near death (narcotics will stop you from breathing if you take too much) will wake up instantly.