healthcare

Surgical care has been compared (at least metaphorically) to airline cockpit crews. But can we learn more about how doctors function from musical ensembles?
The Trump Administration recently issued two executive orders relating to biomedical science. The first involved the regulation of biotechnology products; the second involved transparency in healthcare costs. We believe both are a step in the right direction.
Physicians from across the political spectrum and the country, representing nearly every specialty, came to Washington, DC last week. They did so to advocate for patients, spotlighting many hidden ways healthcare dollars are wasted.
Our culture likes lists. Websites and media entities recognize people click on them often. The problem is that they routinely skew reality, rather than reveal it.
Delivery-focused technology is a boon for healthcare. Whichever company does it best will enhance care quality -- and even possibly reduce costs.
Before endless speculation abounds, as we saw with Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s recent post-operative cancer recovery, or when Melania Trump was admitted for a kidney procedure, it is important to debunk falsehoods.
A heartbreaking tale of technology use gone awry. Despite the many wondrous advances in digital healthcare, its use in end-of-life cases requires well-defined parameters. And customized for families to facilitate humanity, not to replace or undermine it.
With fountain-of-youth and cancer-cure promises galore, what's actually transformative -- and happening now -- might surprise you. The key is where to look.
We hear a great deal about blood sugar while talking about diabetes. But the problems triggered by it have another common theme.
Rent doesn't just refer to apartments and land. Also, rent is not profit, it requires no activity in adding value and it entails little risk. The rising cost of healthcare includes the rising cost of healthcare's rents.
Doing so is becoming increasingly problematic these days, as another person was arrested for practicing medicine without a license. One common aspect among imposters is that they know just enough information to be dangerous. Here's how to separate physician fact from fiction.
Of course, not all causes and manners of death are within our control. Nor should we be so preoccupied with them that we avoid living. But the National Safety Council's annual report proves to be an interesting read, given a 5.3% increase in preventable-injury-related deaths.