healthcare

No, I'm not speaking of Jonathan Goldsmith, the guy who just pretended to be The Most Interesting Man in the World. I'm speaking of the real deal, my grandfather, Dimitri Berezow -- a man who survived Stalin and Hitler, cheated death on multiple occasions, and went on to live the American dream. His was an impossibly unique story – one that seems too extraordinary to be true (and yet is) – capped with a cautionary tale about modern healthcare.
Value-based healthcare: that's the goal. But like blind men touching an elephant, describing one part or another, what we mean by "value" depends on who we are. 
What'cha gonna do when they come for you? If "they" are the officials at the Department of Justice – and you are a pharmaceutical or healthcare company or even a physician – you settle.
This year brought about a number of public debates surrounding not only less-mainstream medical conditions, but also others that were emotionally challenging and ethically complex. Check out which ones made this Top-10 list.
ACSH's Director of Medicine Dr. Jamie Wells interviewed by legendary anchor Rolland Smith and broadcasting veteran Carl Sabatino about the state of medical practice today.
Hey, here’s a novel approach: Appreciate and value the physicians in actual practice and watch job satisfaction soar. Otherwise, don't be surprised that in the next two years nearly 1 in 50 are expected to leave the field entirely to pursue a different career.
In an effort to combat patient non-compliance with medications, the Food and Drug Administration approved the first pill with an ingestible tracking sensor. Will it be used for good or evil, or something in between? 
For the best in hospitality services stick to The Four Seasons, not hospitals.
Few economic opportunities, poor health outcomes, and higher death rates (both natural and self-inflicted). It is difficult to overstate the severity of the crisis facing rural America.
As the highest quality of care continues not to be the emphasis in the health care debate — let alone be on par with discussions around access – Canadian health systems remain in the spotlight. This time multiple hospitals in southern Ontario shut their doors to the sickest of babies. 
Who hasn’t chuckled at a TV prescription drug ad, during its litany of wide-ranging potential side effects? Anal leakage and the oft-repeated erections lasting more than four hours? With direct-to-consumer marketing, product overstatements of health benefits with simultaneous minimization of possible harms have become the norm. Now, the FDA wants to change that.
The U.S. Court of Appeals recently reversed a 2014 district court ruling that affirmed patients had a reasonable expectation of privacy, with respect to their prescription records. It mandated a court order be required before allowing federal agents the ability to obtain such data. The medical consequences are unfavorable.