healthcare

For the best in hospitality services stick to The Four Seasons, not hospitals.
Few economic opportunities, poor health outcomes, and higher death rates (both natural and self-inflicted). It is difficult to overstate the severity of the crisis facing rural America.
As the highest quality of care continues not to be the emphasis in the health care debate — let alone be on par with discussions around access – Canadian health systems remain in the spotlight. This time multiple hospitals in southern Ontario shut their doors to the sickest of babies. 
Who hasn’t chuckled at a TV prescription drug ad, during its litany of wide-ranging potential side effects? Anal leakage and the oft-repeated erections lasting more than four hours? With direct-to-consumer marketing, product overstatements of health benefits with simultaneous minimization of possible harms have become the norm. Now, the FDA wants to change that.
The U.S. Court of Appeals recently reversed a 2014 district court ruling that affirmed patients had a reasonable expectation of privacy, with respect to their prescription records. It mandated a court order be required before allowing federal agents the ability to obtain such data. The medical consequences are unfavorable.
Recently, we published an article More Bad News for Single Payer Health System detailing the reasons for a disastrous report from the National Health Service (NHS) about poor quality of care for the sickest patients. Then, news came out from NHS England that the number of people waiting for routine surgery hit more than 4 million.
With the overload of information — bad, good and worse — from all media mediums, at all times, public confidence in it on the whole is plummeting. That's according to a new report identifying that only 37 percent of the public trusts evidence from medical research. Compare that to 65 percent who prefer experiences of friends and family to guide them.
Several years after Obamacare was approved, healthcare costs continue to rise in America. The question of why – and, perhaps more importantly, how much of these costs should be covered by the government – continue to spark intense political debate. New research may shed some light on this issue.
New titles like “clinician,” “advanced practitioner” or “provider” are masking a stark reality. People will be able to practice medicine without ever attending medical school, performing rigorous residencies or be comprehensively and extensively trained as physicians. It's a frightening – and very real – trend.
When greed trumps science, we all lose. Three women suffered severe vision loss after treatment at the same private "stem cell clinic." Here we address what went so very wrong – and how it can be avoided.
For the first time, President Trump is giving a speech to a joint session of Congress*. Since the President has a habit of keeping us all guessing, here is a wish-list of things we would like to hear Mr. Trump talk about.
Three separate bills have been introduced in the U.S. Congress that are designed to drive a stake into the vampire-like Independent Payment Advisory Board. It has no members, little funding and bipartisan support for its demise.