marijuana

Does marijuana use affect mental health? Cato Institute's Dr. Jeffrey Singer and colleagues address just this in a new pre-print of a paper that is undergoing peer review. The preprint can be read on the medRxiv site.
As non-essential businesses were lock-down over the last few weeks, the regulatory line between essential and non-essential got fuzzy. Some essential services are no-brainers, pharmacies, grocery and food markets, logistical systems, and of course, healthcare facilities. Other businesses were not so lucky, involving crowds that could not be effectively physically distanced – movie theaters and gyms come to mind. And then, of course, there are those grey area businesses.
Over the past several years, as marijuana has gone from illegal to recreational, its use among seniors has increased by 700%. We shouldn’t be surprised. After all, those Boomer seniors use to be young when marijuana was less a gateway to hell -- and more a gateway to Woodstock Nation.
According to the CDC, approximately 26 million Americans smoke tobacco daily. In comparison, 14.6 million smoke marijuana every day. In the headlong green rush for dollars -- it's, after all, a $7 billion market in the U.S. -- no one has been able to answer the question of whether all that pot smoking has any ill effects.
Rarely does a week go by without some rather strange stories emerging about science and medicine. This past week was no exception.
As a society, we have done a good job stigmatizing the completely unacceptable behavior of driving under the influence of alcohol. But because marijuana has been destigmatized, people are driving while high. It's time to take action.
Here's a chemical scare: marijuana will cause men to grow boobs. Unlike most chemical scares, this one is scientifically plausible and probably real, something CNN.com just wrote about. Will Victoria's Secret's business model now expand to include what "Victor" might need?
One of the arguments against the legalization of marijuana is that more teenagers will end up using it. But data show that teenage use of cannabis decreased after legalization.
The mystery of vaping deaths widens. What is going on? Let's ask Steve. We go back a long way, so when a tricky chemistry problem comes up we like to fire off an email, to pick his warped brain. Often he is right on the mark.
It shouldn't really be a surprise when this California city, which doesn't have a clue about the importance of public health, implements a policy that will help kill people.
It's time to take a look at the newest gold rush. The one not related to sustainable energy, but to the cannabinoids: THC and CBD.
Different people respond to cannabis in different ways, making a blood THC level difficult to legislate.