melanoma

The British tabloids are running wild with the story of a 20-year-old woman who had her thumb amputated because of a rare form of cancer. The cause, we are told, was her incessant nail-biting. Believe it or not, this story could very well be true.
A single injection of a potential drug makes green lizards turn black in one minute. It's because the drug turns on the production of melanin, a colored pigment that protects us from sunlight. Could this drug reduce our chances of getting melanoma? Maybe.   
Lululemon makes it easy to find great yoga pants and tote bags. Sound health advice - not so much. Perhaps Lululemon should stick to what they are good at and leave the science and medicine to the experts. 
A statement released by Habitat for Humanity stated that the former U.S. president "was dehydrated working in the hot sun and ha[d] been taken offsite for observation." With that we ask, "Who is at risk of heat-related illnesses?"
It's time to take a look at the true level of importance of “sunshine” Vitamin D – in staving off disease, preserving healthy bones and assessing the actual hazards of deficiency and toxicity. 
A dangerous practice
It's been nearly one year since the Food and Drug Administration recommended that teens be prevented from using tanning beds, however the agency has yet to make its final ruling. But a new study estimating significant financial and life-saving benefits of such a ban will hopefully prompt the FDA to finally act.
The famous singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen, as per his manager Robert B. Kory’s statement, “died during his sleep following a fall in the middle of the night on November 7th."  Ironically, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) just released their estimates of the top 5 causes of preventable deaths.
Concluding our two-part series on important melanoma topics, we focus on immunotherapy and the new frontier in the areas of research and treatment by engaging three experts from the Wistar Institute Melanoma Research Center.  
Did you know Bob Marley died of melanoma? Or, that Jimmy Carter was recently "cured" of metastatic melanoma? Many misperceptions abound with respect to skin cancer — specifically melanoma — so we will address them here with Part 1 of a two-part series. To debunk myths about who is at risk, discuss hot topics in the field and learn what treatments loom on the horizon, I enlisted the help of three leading melanoma researchers from The Wistar Institute —our nation’s first independent biomedical research facility where I am a member of the leadership council.
In the spirit of Breast Cancer awareness month and promoting women’s health, we are excited to have had Dr. Susan Wolf in our Manhattan office today for our Making the Rounds Facebook Live video streaming series.  Dr. Wolf is a Reproductive Endocrinologist specializing in infertility and menopause.  Additionally, she is a breast cancer and melanoma survivor - and, “borderline ovarian” which she personally addressed in our discussion.  Watch the session now! 
The USPSTF reports that the evidence for screening for skin cancer is weak. Some dermatologists are concerned, saying that lack of evidence of benefit doesn't mean there is no benefit. What should a patient think or do?
Oh, the ole sun debate: Get too much and you risk getting skin cancer; get too little and you may lack vitamin D. The struggle is real. So, how to find the balance?