mental health

A long campaign season might make American politicians uniquely incentivized not to solve problems. It's easier to raise money and scare up enough votes to get elected by promising change, rather than actually delivering it. This harms public health.
A 16-year-old girl uses her social media account to post this question: Should I kill myself? Sixty-nine percent of people who responded said yes. So she did. This isn't the plot of a twisted new movie. This, according to a report coming from Malaysia, actually happened. There are four important points to discuss stemming from this tragedy.
A new study reveals that reduced telomere length is associated with childhood trauma in those with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Does this new research make a compelling case for its use in the real, not theoretical, world?
Of course, not all causes and manners of death are within our control. Nor should we be so preoccupied with them that we avoid living. But the National Safety Council's annual report proves to be an interesting read, given a 5.3% increase in preventable-injury-related deaths.
In the short term, it seems that social media could be helpful in creating supportive networks for people with poor mental health. But in the long term, it depends on how we start to challenge societal perceptions of the issue. If nothing changes, then at least be prepared for challenges ahead.
Dismissing this encounter as that of another entitled teen ignores a major societal problem that needs fixing.
Insomnia affects roughly 10% of the population. Those who suffer from this sleep disorder constitute a wide variety of personalities and family histories. The inconsistent pattern among these patients makes the condition difficult to classify, which in turn makes it difficult to understand. Now, new research has identified five insomnia subtypes based on non-sleep characteristics.
Our ability to forget provides a survival advantage – while assuaging suffering in the process.
By encouraging the avoidance of unpleasant things and equalizing all degrees of suffering, our culture has overcorrected to the point of hampering child development.
In New Zealand, the Chief Censor adjusted the movie's rating due to "triggering" content. Is this a reasonable health-based decision to protect moviegoers?
Now, Disney Princesses and films are under attack. We are straying further and further from what most impacts child development, as a source of adult challenges.
With Wednesday marking this annual occasion, the new film is an important reminder of the profound suffering of those challenged by mental illness and the struggles shared by their loved ones. Optimizing mental health in life is worthwhile for everyone.