tobacco

Fuzzy math rears its head in a new report on smoking and healthcare costs. Smoking is a big health risk, and we don't need fuzzy math to see that greatly reducing this health hazard will reduce tobacco-related costs.
The CDC says "tobacco use by youth is rising." If that were to be true, it'd be horrible -- but it's not. Cigarette use is down. The only reason the CDC can make this claim is because the agency considers e-cigarettes and vaping devices -- which only contain nicotine -- to be tobacco products. This is misleading and undermines public health.
In service of their ideological agenda, the "abstinence-only" nicotine religion is perfectly happy to withhold potentially life-saving e-cigarettes from smokers. If a few million smokers have to die along the way, those are casualties they're willing to accept in pursuit of their nicotine-free utopia.
Advertising of tobacco products on TV and radio has been verboten since 1971 to reduce the appeal of such products — especially to kids. That, of course, was long before the age of the internet, and a new study finds that online tobacco marketing is linked to an increased risk that adolescents will start using these products.
A recent CDC report provides targets for smoking cessation education. Overall, only about 15 percent of working adults are smoking cigarettes. But the prevalence varies by occupation, with over 20 percent of those in the construction and repair industries reporting cigarette use.
Just because a current smoker first started with e-cigarettes does not mean that e-cigarettes caused that person to smoke. It's probably true that teenage tobacco users also consume alcohol and caffeine. According to the CDC's faulty logic, therefore, we could also conclude that beer and soda are gateway drugs.
Once again, the echo-chamber nature of press releases serves to promote misleading science and internet "health news" clickbait. This time, it's with headlines claiming that tobacco – not marijuana – boosts early stroke risk. So is this fact or fiction? Let's take a look.
The Centers for Disease Control found that recent use of cigarettes by teens decreased, while use of e-cigarettes increased. So that's a good thing, right? Well, not according to the agency, which now wants us to be concerned about nicotine addition.
While the forces arrayed against harm reduced products (e-cigarettes, vapor products) are formidable Big Tobacco, Big Government, Big "Public Health" the millions of ex-smokers who now vape instead will eventually hold sway, one way or another. There is light in the tunnel, so don't lose hope.
A discussion in Rolling Stone magazine of vaping, and the hysteria and fearmongering about it, is a breath of fresh air.
A recent CDC survey of adult behaviors found that more recent quitters, and those who have tried to quit, are using e-cigarettes.
A new Reuters survey confirms what those interested and involved in smoking and tobacco-related issues have observed: more and more Americans are using e-cigarettes and vapor products (vaping), to quit or reduce their consumption of deadly cigarettes.