weight loss

What would you say if there was a way to lose weight while eating a high-fat diet – and you wouldn't even have to sell your soul to the devil? But part of the deal would be that you'd have to stop smelling for a while. Interested? Allow us to explain. 
An important question is what type of exercise — aerobic, such as walking, swimming or bike riding; or resistance, such as weight lifting — would help the older obese person who's looking to lose weight? The answer is both, particularly when done in tandem.
The search for the "best" way to lose weight has lately focused on the idea of intermittent fasting. But unfortunately for its enthusiastic proponents, a new well-designed study indicates that simply changing the pattern of calorie restriction isn't more effective for weight loss than simply restricting energy intake consistently.
Apparently, you can make any claim with an Asterisk (*), so long as the asterisk clarifies that your claim isn't true. In one of Dr. Oz's latest press releases, the TV 'doc' touts apple cider vinegar (or any vinegar) as a miracle health benefit: it improves blood flow, prevents diabetes, encourages weight loss, and prevents cancer. But not too long ago on the Dr. Oz show, he caveats his claims by saying this: "
There are so many fad weight-loss diets out there that it's hard to pick a few favorites — but we did. Some are based on pseudoscience, and others on nothing at all. But all demonstrate the amazing creativity that can be brought to bear on a serious problem like obesity.
Will "Adiposity-Based Chronic Disease" change personal behavior, the way the term "obesity" could not? Two scientific associations that made the switch hope it will.
I can burn how many calories while shoveling?  You don't have to resolve to hit the gym this month, especially if you can easily burn 200-400 calories while doing winter outdoor activities: skiing, snowshoeing, and even shoveling.     
Ah yes, holiday time is here — so is egg nog, Christmas cookies and Hanukkah latkes — all designed to pack on the pounds. So how to best prevent or treat the resulting overweight or obesity? Science tells us there's no best way. But as we've thought for a while, there are many ways to take the weight off. And if one doesn't work another just might.
Activity trackers of all sorts have become must-have piece of technology — the theory being that they can encourage people to move more. But can activity trackers added to standard behavioral interventions help people lose more weight and maintain the weight loss longer? A recent study says ... not so much.
We here at the council enjoy debunking health fads. We especially enjoy debunking — in both print and video — weight loss fads. In fact, just last week I debunked one of the hottest trends in weight loss: body wraps. I don't know why this is, but something about selling unrealistic goals to vulnerable consumers for financial gain that only benefits the person at the top of the pyramid scheme really irks me. 
Sure, it would be great if there were one magical thing you could do to lose weight, without lifting a finger
It's easy to be led astray by trusting to logic when evaluating health advice. But sometimes logic is borne out by science, as in the case of a recent study of prevention of knee arthritis by weight loss in overweight and obese women.