diet soda

On Episode 2 of the ACSH Science Dispatch Podcast, we examine New York City's now-defunct COVID vaccine mandate. Did it work, why or why not? We then dive into recent research showing that diet soda can help you safely lose weight, despite popular claims to the contrary.
Ordering diet soda significantly reduces the number of calories customers eat when they visit fast food restaurants, according to a recent study. The paper is an example of scientists reaching the right conclusion for the wrong reasons.
A new systematic review and meta-analysis suggests that drinks sweetened with sugar substitutes may promote weight loss. Could these results end the dispute over the benefits of diet soda? Let's take a closer look.
Here's what we have for you this time: Why Doctors Think They're the Best ... an introduction to the beautiful writing of Robert McFarlane ... a nod to Dr. Aaron Carroll and the fight to debunk bad healthcare claims ... and finally, considering two views of climate change: the "gradualist" and the "catastrophist."
Evidence consistently shows diet soda isn't harmful. Why does the media insist we quit drinking it?
Did you ever pop open a Diet Coke, take a sip, and spit it out because it tastes like battery acid? The aspartame has gone "bad." But is that bad for you? Organic chemistry gives us the answer.
A new study suggests that many people who drink diet soda to lose weight might sabotage these efforts by consuming more calories from other sources.
In just a few days, Diet Pepsi will no longer contain the artificial sweetener aspartame. PepsiCo is replacing aspartame in Diet Pepsi, Caffeine Free Diet Pepsi, and Wild
The claim that artificial sweeteners might contribute to obesity is one we have seen many times in the past. The newest study on the subject is a research article just published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society which evaluated the possibility of a relationship between the consumption of diet soda and increasing waist circumference (WC) in older Americans (i.e., over 65 years old).
According to an article in the New York Times, the three largest soda companies, Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, and the Dr. Pepper Snapple Group, have agreed to help consumers limit their caloric consumption by modifying their products.
We thought we hammered an Israeli study on artificial sweeteners pretty hard in our Sept 18th Dispatch article Israeli study on sugar substitutes is complete bullsweet. Maybe we did, but we were seriously out-hammered by Matt Raymond s piece Of Mice and Media: A Credulous Response to an Iffy Sweetener Study.