Other Science News

The reality is simple: In the developed world, you have very little to fear. We live our lives in good health and safety, and much of that is attributable to the wonderful advances of science and technology.
Celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune disorder that is marked by damage to the lining of the small intestine, can only be treated by following a gluten free (GF) diet. Removing gluten works because gluten is the protein that the body reacts to in order to start the inflammatory response that damages the small intestine.  But, that is harder than it sounds. Because maintaining a GF diet is challenging, people who have celiac disease long for therapies that may be able to help them keep gluten out of their systems. These would work, in theory, by degrading any gluten that happened to enter into their diet, either knowingly or accidentally. 
Trending this summer is the oh-so-delicious Moscow Mule, served traditionally in a solid copper mug. Lovers of the mule swear by its unique taste (thanks to the copper). But the dangers of the drink don't lie in the alcohol, but rather in the copper leaching into your drink.
Winston Churchill once said that Russia is "a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma." That's in many ways still true. However, Russia is a complete open book compared to the Hermit Kingdom. The latest development in the ongoing saga of North Korea is Kim Jong-Un's threat to attack Guam. If he was capable of that (and he very well might be), would he actually do it?
Just because you did something once last year in Mexico does not mean you can do it here. That is the message the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is sending to a physician in New York. Dr. John Zhang runs the New Hope Fertility Center. The center, located in a high rent district of Manhattan, is in the business of infertility treatments which are generally not a problem. It is, specifically, fertility treatments using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replacement therapy (MRT) that were banned. Dr. Zhang started marketing this type of treatment through the website of his company Darwin Life (the website was not available at the time of this writing.)
I take you behind-the-scenes as a judge for the Miss America's Outstanding Teen scholarship competition. 
Five months ago this week, a 30-year-old named Jade Erick died after receiving an intravenous infusion of curcumin - the compound in turmeric that is thought by naturopaths to have medicinal qualities (but doesn't). The FDA investigated and now we know what probably killed her. The bag of curcumin also had 
People commit suicide for various reasons: Depression, loneliness, mental illness, drug addiction, relationship trouble, financial hardship, and bullying have all been implicated. Determining the predominant causes of suicide in each age and ethnic demographic would be a major step toward reversing this troubling trend.
"Fake news" has become a meme — and it's all over the Internet. For example, take a look at a site that claims to provide real evidence that aspartame is carcinogenic in humans. Not only does it cite old data, it has picked a study whose authors don't agree with them. Can you get much more fake than that?
Given modern medical advances extending survival rates for chronic diseases, while at the same time overall life expectancy continues to lengthen, companies are diving into niche markets. Take, for example, Hormel — makers of Dinty Moore stews and Spam – which has come up with a meal line specifically targeted to cancer patients.
John Urschel, 26, an offensive lineman for the Baltimore Ravens, abruptly retired from the NFL. The decision by the soft-spoken genius pursuing a math doctorate at MIT, came just two days after the release of a a weighted CTE study, which stated that of the late NFL players' brains 99% tested positive for the disease's irreversible, degenerative brain damage.
A pesky parasite lurks warm freshwater lakes and ponds in the dog days of summer.. It's not serious, but it's certainly itchy!