Parents & Kids

A guide to those in college considering a career in medicine, or others contemplating a shift into or within healthcare and its related professions.
Aside from suffocation and strangulation which are responsible for 25 percent of all sleep-related deaths, other causes of SIDS remain somewhat of a mystery to scientists and parents. But in recent years, much research has explored neurological variants, like serotonin levels in the brain, and a gene variant that could provide some insight.
Considered a win for free-range parenting, a new Utah law that goes into effect in May modifies the definition of child neglect. It allows kids "of sufficient age and maturity ... to engage in independent activities.” But what does it mean that such an action had to be taken in the first place?
A father was not permitted to board a Frontier flight with his 4-day-old infant because the airline’s policy insists on a newborn being at least 7 days old. Is such a policy sensible or not?
The use of sophisticated econometric techniques does not demonstrate that the introduction of formula to low- and middle-income countries resulted in a higher infant mortality. At best, it demonstrates that how the formula was reconstituted had an effect. And at worst, it is advocacy disguised by mathematical technique.
Three daycare workers in Chicago were arrested and charged with child endangerment after it was learned they fed their charges gummies containing the sleep-inducing supplement melatonin. What's wrong with that? Plenty.
An elementary school child who has difficulty reading is likely to have his or her eyesight checked and if the results come back as 20/20, it might be assumed that the eyes aren't the problem. But recent research suggests even kids who make that particular grade may still have an eye-related problem, and different testing procedures are in order.
In the first of a series for the FOX podcast network, the Council's medical director clarifies misperceptions surrounding infant nutrition. This includes new trends, like importing specific organic formulas from overseas for being so-called "more pure" or "natural."
When bitter custody battles hit the front page (e.g. the mom recently jailed for secretly baptizing her daughter), it is mostly the child who suffers.
Given the countless books written on babies – month-to-month pregnancy guides, labor and delivery primers, and others particularly on sleeping and feeding – information overload is very real. But then again, there are books like The Baby Whisperer that make you glad you added it to your family library.  
He oversleeps, can't find his jacket and still wins gold at the Olympics. The tale of 17-year-old Red Gerard's victory has lessons for us all.
Out of more than 140,000 contestants vying to become the 2018 Gerber Spokesbaby, Lucas Warren from Georgia will be the first with Down Syndrome in the competition’s roughly 90 year history. What took so long!