Chemophobia

Dr. Gilbert Ross in Science 2.0 The baseless, superstitious fear of chemicals has certainly gripped our supposedly advanced population in a haze of inchoate panic akin to the residents of 17th century Salem, or Europeans of the Dark Ages
It s Monday morning. No one is in a particularly good mood. This didn't help. We have been discussing BPA a component of polycarbonate and polyether plastics forever. This should be #1000 on your list of things to worry about (#999 is being hit by a giraffe that fell off a skyscraper.)
Maybe the name Yvette d'Entremont doesn t a ring a bell to you, or maybe you know her by her internet persona: The SciBabe. Whatever your familiarity level is with her you need to dial it way up. Start following and listening to her because she is bringing the heat. Last
A supposedly scientific body in the EU has called for stringent restrictions and bans on neonicotinoid (neonics) pesticides, based on...who knows what? Sustainability? Biodiversity? Whatever: the evidence on bee colony effects didn t work, so let s try these.
Yawn. It s that time of year again. Perhaps for the lack of anything better to do, Ken Cook and his Environmental Working Group (EWG) merry men (and women) are celebrating World Let s Promote Ignorance Day, thanks to their annual Dirty Dozen list.
A report from the Harvard School of Public Health is hitting the headlines hard today. The conclusion: Men who eat produce with pesticide residue have poorer sperm quality than those who don t.
There must be something in the water in Montgomery County, Maryland. But what s in there is more likely to be LSD, rather than the chemicals that they are trying to ban. A series of disjointed regulations that are worthy of The Three Stooges is on the table. If the folks in charge there weren't serious, this would be nothing short of hilarious. Which it really is anyhow.
Atrazine, one of the most effective and commonly used herbicides (weed-killers) in the world, is back in the news. Today s New York Times international business article discusses disparities in regulations that complicate Trans-Atlantic trade. Specifically
At ACSH, we are always on the lookout for bad headlines. Thanks to CBS News, we have a real beauty. It s so bad that, despite the fact there are more than 10 months left in the year, this one will come out on top (bottom?). It s that bad.
Dr. Henry Miller recently penned an informative piece on the EPA s chemophobia for Forbes.com titled A Wake-Up Call for U.S. Farmers: The EPA Is Trying to Put You Out of Business. He argues that American farmers, and the rest of us, need to realize the damage that will be done if the EPA needlessly restricts or eliminates neonics. Dr. Miller references the EPA s recently issued report claiming that neonics provide negligible overall benefits in growing soy crops. However, they
California s Proposition 65 is a law that helps no one except perhaps trial lawyers and bounty hunters.
In a recent article from Africa Fighting Malaria, author Jasson Urbach addresses the harmful effects of banning a class of insecticides: neonicotinoids. Urbach compares the unfounded fears of neonics with those of DDT, giving a brief history of the negative effects that bans on DDT have had on public health. For example, when South Africa