Chemophobia

At ACSH, we are always on the lookout for bad headlines. Thanks to CBS News, we have a real beauty. It s so bad that, despite the fact there are more than 10 months left in the year, this one will come out on top (bottom?). It s that bad.
Dr. Henry Miller recently penned an informative piece on the EPA s chemophobia for Forbes.com titled A Wake-Up Call for U.S. Farmers: The EPA Is Trying to Put You Out of Business. He argues that American farmers, and the rest of us, need to realize the damage that will be done if the EPA needlessly restricts or eliminates neonics. Dr. Miller references the EPA s recently issued report claiming that neonics provide negligible overall benefits in growing soy crops. However, they
California s Proposition 65 is a law that helps no one except perhaps trial lawyers and bounty hunters.
In a recent article from Africa Fighting Malaria, author Jasson Urbach addresses the harmful effects of banning a class of insecticides: neonicotinoids. Urbach compares the unfounded fears of neonics with those of DDT, giving a brief history of the negative effects that bans on DDT have had on public health. For example, when South Africa
What appears to be a big decision by McDonald s to keep using their current potatoes rather than switch to GM potatoes turns out to be, at least scientifically, no decision at all. This is because on this particular
An op-ed in the November 9 New York Times, entitled Making Chemistry Green, by Robert S. Lawrence and Rolf U. Halden could have been entitled Green in Chemistry. based on some rather obvious errors.
Here she goes again. Deborah Blum couldn t resist bemoaning the state of our environment this time, trace chemicals in water. In her New York Times Sept 25th blog, A Rising Tide of Contaminants, Blum seems to be trying to convince us that we are drinking pure poison. If followed to its logical conclusion, one might wonder why anyone is still alive.
The NYTimes Well blog tries, again, to scare women about bogeymen toxic chemicals. Another Deborah Blum special, based on zero science and plenty of hype and half-truths (if that much).
Regular Dispatch readers will know that we have discussed BPA perhaps the poster child of the anti chemical movement until we are blue in the face (BTF?). So, it is always nice to know that there are others out there who really understand this topic and agree with us scientifically.
Last winter Consumer Reports came out with a relatively new scare concerns about a chemical in cola drinks, and other foods with some forms of caramel coloring. The chemical in question is 4-MEI, an abbreviation for 4-Methylimidazole, produced as a byproduct of the manufacture of caramel.
If you re looking for an example of the absurdity of what happens when activist groups stick their noses in areas that are way above their pay grade, look no further. It doesn t get any better than this.
Chemicals found in moms and kids, screams the headline! There is nothing new. This time, the news comes from an article in the Chicago Tribune written by Michael Hawthorne. News is a stretch, since this has been going on forever, with the same arguments being recycled over and over.