Chemophobia

What appears to be a big decision by McDonald s to keep using their current potatoes rather than switch to GM potatoes turns out to be, at least scientifically, no decision at all. This is because on this particular
An op-ed in the November 9 New York Times, entitled Making Chemistry Green, by Robert S. Lawrence and Rolf U. Halden could have been entitled Green in Chemistry. based on some rather obvious errors.
Here she goes again. Deborah Blum couldn t resist bemoaning the state of our environment this time, trace chemicals in water. In her New York Times Sept 25th blog, A Rising Tide of Contaminants, Blum seems to be trying to convince us that we are drinking pure poison. If followed to its logical conclusion, one might wonder why anyone is still alive.
The NYTimes Well blog tries, again, to scare women about bogeymen toxic chemicals. Another Deborah Blum special, based on zero science and plenty of hype and half-truths (if that much).
Regular Dispatch readers will know that we have discussed BPA perhaps the poster child of the anti chemical movement until we are blue in the face (BTF?). So, it is always nice to know that there are others out there who really understand this topic and agree with us scientifically.
Last winter Consumer Reports came out with a relatively new scare concerns about a chemical in cola drinks, and other foods with some forms of caramel coloring. The chemical in question is 4-MEI, an abbreviation for 4-Methylimidazole, produced as a byproduct of the manufacture of caramel.
If you re looking for an example of the absurdity of what happens when activist groups stick their noses in areas that are way above their pay grade, look no further. It doesn t get any better than this.
Chemicals found in moms and kids, screams the headline! There is nothing new. This time, the news comes from an article in the Chicago Tribune written by Michael Hawthorne. News is a stretch, since this has been going on forever, with the same arguments being recycled over and over.
Maine s toxic chemicals likely to expand, based on science-free consumer concerns: hyper-precaution as usual. This goes way past even the hyper-precautionary federal Environmental Protection Agency.
Our regular readers will be forgiven if they are stricken with a case of deja vu right now. Over the past year, ACSH has weighed in often (and in no uncertain terms) about the foolishness of rejecting mosquito eradication programs in populated areas.
Twenty-five years ago ACSH produced a video, narrated by none other than the late, great journalist Walter Cronkite, to counter the widespread perception that Americans health was at great risk because of our use of synthetic pesticides and other chemicals.
Last year we at ACSH were instrumental in getting the village of Ocean Beach, located on Long Island, to overturn its decades-old chemophobic policy of refusing to participate in the mosquito control program that was routinely used in most of Long Island, as well as wide areas of New York City. We were prompted to do so after ACSH friend Jim Capuono a six year survivor of colon cancer nearly died from West Nile encephalitis, which he contracted from mosquitoes while vacationing in Ocean Beach in August, 2012.