weight loss

Two recent observational studies found that remission from Type 2 diabetes is as easy -- or hard -- as losing a significant amount of weight.
Would knowing more about one's genetic makeup help select the best type of diet for weight loss? Apparently not, since researchers found that information about a person's DNA doesn't help when choosing between low-fat and low-carb diets.
If you want to lose weight – excluding all fad diets – how should you eat? A new study suggests that it's more effective to choose foods with lower calories than to try to simply eat less of everything.
Back from maternity leave, Ana Dolaskie shares her thoughts on why most resolutions fail, and key factors in the ones that succeed.
Someone considering bariatric surgery, specifically the so-called Roux-en-Y procedure, will be glad to know that the benefits are long-lasting, according to a new study. Those who underwent it not only maintained much of their weight loss for at least 12 years, they also were less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than equally-obese people who didn't have that surgery.
Heparin, which has primarily been used for the treatment of blood clots, is one of the oldest medications still in use. New research indicates that heparin has a more diverse physiological role, one of which stimulates food intake and decreases metabolism. This could have profound clinical implications, both in its current clinical use and for the future of developing weight-loss drugs.
What would you say if there was a way to lose weight while eating a high-fat diet – and you wouldn't even have to sell your soul to the devil? But part of the deal would be that you'd have to stop smelling for a while. Interested? Allow us to explain. 
An important question is what type of exercise — aerobic, such as walking, swimming or bike riding; or resistance, such as weight lifting — would help the older obese person who's looking to lose weight? The answer is both, particularly when done in tandem.
The search for the "best" way to lose weight has lately focused on the idea of intermittent fasting. But unfortunately for its enthusiastic proponents, a new well-designed study indicates that simply changing the pattern of calorie restriction isn't more effective for weight loss than simply restricting energy intake consistently.
Apparently, you can make any claim with an Asterisk (*), so long as the asterisk clarifies that your claim isn't true. In one of Dr. Oz's latest press releases, the TV 'doc' touts apple cider vinegar (or any vinegar) as a miracle health benefit: it improves blood flow, prevents diabetes, encourages weight loss, and prevents cancer. But not too long ago on the Dr. Oz show, he caveats his claims by saying this: "
There are so many fad weight-loss diets out there that it's hard to pick a few favorites — but we did. Some are based on pseudoscience, and others on nothing at all. But all demonstrate the amazing creativity that can be brought to bear on a serious problem like obesity.
Will "Adiposity-Based Chronic Disease" change personal behavior, the way the term "obesity" could not? Two scientific associations that made the switch hope it will.