weight loss

Are "ultra-processed" foods addictive? Some scientists say yes, pointing to experiments with sugar-craving rats and the difficulty many people have losing weight and keeping it off. Taken in isolation, these observations lend themselves to a food addiction model, but there's actually little evidence to support the theory.
A lot has been written about the strengths and weaknesses of using DNA testing to customize individual diets. It's a promising idea, but our knowledge of genetics isn't yet good enough to pinpoint what each of us should eat.
Whether the source is carbohydrates, protein, or fat, a calorie is a calorie. New dietary math based on the microbiome says that a calorie may get eaten– not by us – but by our bacterial companions, altering the balance needed to reduce one’s weight.
Once again, it seems you are what you eat, but only if you consider what your digestive tract’s microbiome is willing to snack on.
Obesity remains a significant public health problem. Now that we have the basic physiology in hand, it’s time to talk about the biggest problem in reducing this disease: human behavior.
Most individuals simply have a very unrealistic expectation as to how many calories they burn during exercise and what they can achieve in weight loss through exercise alone, even though they may have expended a great deal of effort to do so.
“Nothing in the world is worth having or worth doing unless it means effort, pain, difficulty…” President Theodore Roosevelt Although his inference was to the expected lack of success in life without these three qualities, the same can be said regarding weight loss programs - without an anticipated level of significant effort, pain, and difficulty will only lead to disastrous long-term results.
The singer Adele, and her significant slim down, has been credited to a combination of exercise and eating so-called “sirtfoods.” So what is the sirt diet -- and could it work for you? Let's take a look.
Two recent observational studies found that remission from Type 2 diabetes is as easy -- or hard -- as losing a significant amount of weight.
Would knowing more about one's genetic makeup help select the best type of diet for weight loss? Apparently not, since researchers found that information about a person's DNA doesn't help when choosing between low-fat and low-carb diets.
If you want to lose weight – excluding all fad diets – how should you eat? A new study suggests that it's more effective to choose foods with lower calories than to try to simply eat less of everything.
Back from maternity leave, Ana Dolaskie shares her thoughts on why most resolutions fail, and key factors in the ones that succeed.