cannabis

Is marijuana really the low-risk drug that many Americans believe it is? Emergency room physician Dr. Roneet Lev says the popular conception of cannabis—as an all-natural treatment for pain, anxiety, seizures, and so many other ailments—is far too simplistic. She joins us on episode 25 of the Science Dispatch podcast.
Cannabis is a complex mixture of hundreds of chemicals. Here’s a look at one of them.
Given the proliferation of claims about the health benefits of marijuana – especially following its decriminalization – it should come as no surprise that cannabis-based chemicals are being evaluated as potential COVID therapies. Two of them, CBGA and CBDA, have been found to bind to the infamous viral spikes and inhibit the replication of COVID. Do these drugs have what it takes to make a useful drug? Read on.
As if the confusion over marijuana, THC, and CBD oil isn't enough – both legally and pharmacologically – now there's a new wrinkle. It’s called Delta-8 THC, a previously minuscule and unimportant component of cannabis, which is virtually identical to THC itself. It's now possible to make the drug, also called "THC-light," from CBD oil. What does this mean? Read on. If you dare.
One of the arguments against the legalization of marijuana is that more teenagers will end up using it. But data show that teenage use of cannabis decreased after legalization.
It's time for marijuana advocates to admit what's plainly obvious: Pot is a recreational drug. But let's stop pretending that cannabis is a miraculous painkiller or wonder drug. Most people who use it simply like getting high. And let's stop denying that legalizing marijuana will come with some serious public health consequences.
Once again, the echo-chamber nature of press releases serves to promote misleading science and internet "health news" clickbait. This time, it's with headlines claiming that tobacco – not marijuana – boosts early stroke risk. So is this fact or fiction? Let's take a look.
So you don't want to smoke marijuana, nor eat it in calorie-laden junk food. Would you prefer a cannabis beverage? These just might be coming down the pike soon, if certain entrepreneurs have their way.
A new study published in JAMA reports that the labels on most edible marijuana products either overstate or understate the amount of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC -- the active component in cannabis) that they contain.