obesity

Sleep deprivation has been associated with an increased risk of obesity in several studies. A new one, based on a large British survey, assessed whether that link could be due to over-eating by bleary-eyed people. But the data didn't support that hypothesis, so researchers will have to look harder to explain that link.
While bariatric surgery is the most effective means of dealing with extreme obesity, subjects must still exercise some degree of dietary discipline to obtain the most benefit. A new analysis finds that the degree of early weight loss predicts long-term success, and both are linked to decreases in energy intake.
It's well known that menopause incurs many negative consequences, including hot flashes, bone loss and added weight in the abdominal area (visceral fat — the worst kind). Any of these can have negative health effects, and current treatment options such as drugs to prevent/treat osteoporosis don't do anything for added fat, or vice versa. But recent research in mice suggests that blocking the hormone FSH could greatly help.
A new report supposedly gives credence to the idea that "endocrine disrupting chemicals" found in house dust can cause obesity. But the results weren't even found in animals, let alone humans.
America has about the highest proportion of overweight and obese on Earth, but the rest of the world is hot on our heels. A massive meta-analysis of global data indicates that between 1980 and 2015 the prevalence of obesity doubled in more than 70 countries.
An important question is what type of exercise — aerobic, such as walking, swimming or bike riding; or resistance, such as weight lifting — would help the older obese person who's looking to lose weight? The answer is both, particularly when done in tandem.
Many groups blame sugar and sugar-sweetened beverages for the epidemic of obesity. Some have argued that a tax on them would lower consumption, and thus decrease the prevalence of obesity. But a recent Australian study showed that decreasing intake of these drinks was actually accompanied by an increase in obesity prevalence.
When a well-respected researcher proposes a strange way to influence people's food choices – with the goal of reducing obesity – one must pay attention, but not necessarily go along on that particular ride.
Not only does bariatric surgery provide substantial weight loss to the obese, but it can also ameliorate the metabolic derangements of diabetes and decrease their need for medications. And, a new randomized study found, these beneficial results aren't transient — they were still apparent five years post-surgery and were superior to the results of strictly medical treatment.
Public health experts have noted the unexplained increases in childhood asthma and autism spectrum disorders over the past few decades. A recent review has linked such ills to the coincident increases in obesity in women of childbearing age.
Will "Adiposity-Based Chronic Disease" change personal behavior, the way the term "obesity" could not? Two scientific associations that made the switch hope it will.
Among the claims made by the plaintiff, Center for Science in the Public Interest, is this: “Like the tobacco industry, Coca-Cola needs to replenish the ranks of its customers, and it tries to recruit them young.” But on this issue, what does science have to say?