Food & Nutrition

Reports on obesity and its purported link to sugar-sweetened beverages from the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity read like a broken record these days. In the center s latest pronouncement, aimed at a presentation at the American Public Health Association s annual meeting, a group led by the Rudd Center s Jennifer Harris is wagging its collective finger at certain beverage companies for marketing full-calorie drinks and those that contain sugar, artificial sweeteners, and caffeine directly to children.
An overwhelming body of scientific data indicates that irradiated food is safe, nutritious, and wholesome. Health authorities worldwide, including leading national and international scientific organizations, have based their approvals of food irradiation on the results of sound scientific research. Irradiation increases the safety profile and the availability of a variety of foods. The safety of food irradiation has been studied more extensively than that of any other food preservation process. As is true of other food processes, irradiation can lead to chemical changes in food.
The recent addition of trans fat information to the Nutrition Facts labels on food products, combined with news media reports and activists warnings, have brought these fats to the forefront of public concern. In a national survey conducted in November 2005, 81 percent of a representative sample of U.S. consumers reported being aware of trans fats, and 54 percent indicated that they were trying to decrease their trans fat consumption (IFIC Foundation, 2006). Putting the role of trans fatty acids (TFAs) into perspective can be difficult, both because of the intensity of the rhetoric surrounding them and because of widely varying claims about the extent of the health risk they pose.
First Edition, October 1982 Second Edition (revised and updated), July 1985 Third Edition (revised and updated), December 1988 Fourth Edition (revised and updated), March 1996 Revised and updated by Paisan Loaharanu, M.S. International Consultant Former Head Food and Environmental Protection Section Joint FAO/IAEA Division, Vienna, Austria
This report represents a work in progress. ACSH realizes that research in the areas of health impacts of alcoholic beverages and of tobacco products is continuing, and we will update this paper as new research and insights are received. We welcome input from readers. Public policy makers and legislators face complex challenges when evaluating regulatory and educational approaches to the use of alcoholic beverages and tobacco products. Although the two substances are often presented as if they have similar impacts on health, an examination of the substantial differences in their health-related benefits and risks indicates that they should not be linked for regulatory or educational purposes. This paper briefly reviews:
This report represents a work in progress. ACSH realizes that research in the areas of health impacts of alcoholic beverages is continuing, and we will update this paper as new research and insights are received. We welcome input from readers. Executive Summary