Food & Nutrition

Exercise is good for us, and inactivity isn't. A new study emphasizes that not only is that true, but the pattern of inactivity – as well as the amount of inactive time – can increase the risk of mortality.
Pumpkin season is here, but it's more than just a fad. There's a bit of science behind why we're so obsessed with pumpkin spice everything!
Tired of the same ole boring ways to contract food-borne illness? Look no further than chicken tartare: raw, seasoned chicken, now served at restaurants near you. 
A high school student who makes bad grades is not only setting himself up for professional failure; he's also likely making lifestyle choices that will put him on a course to bad health.
A new survey from Michigan State University provides a somewhat depressing glimpse of the current understanding of food by the American public. And this is particularly disturbing because younger folks are less well informed than their elders.
Sleep deprivation has been associated with an increased risk of obesity in several studies. A new one, based on a large British survey, assessed whether that link could be due to over-eating by bleary-eyed people. But the data didn't support that hypothesis, so researchers will have to look harder to explain that link.
Very few have heard about this. It's over 100 years old and explains why bread smells so good and turns brown. But baking also produces a few chemicals of concern – or are they? Here you get a chemistry lesson! Whether you want one or not.
Results of a recent prospective study of food intake in 18 countries —including North and South America, Europe, and Asia — reports that an increased intake of fruits, vegetables and legumes is associated with a lower risk of death. But the same study was analyzed to see what effect different dietary nutrients might have and found that it's carbs, not fat that seem to be dietary villains.
Enough already! Please stop with the avocado stories. The darn things contain plenty of folic acid, which may or may not cause or prevent cancer, or keep your hair from turning gray, and may be contributing to the demise of the English language. And it's all about the biochemistry of endogenous formaldehyde. Prepare to be confused. 
The literature is filled to overflowing with "publish or perish" articles. So how do we know what to read? Well, the same people that brought you so, so many articles have a curated solution to your current awareness overload.
Skipping breakfast has been linked to increasing the risk of overweight and obesity. But a new study finds that the main problem in breakfast skipping children is a deficit in some pretty important nutrients.
Peanut allergy is among a parent's worst nightmares — a child is at constant risk of life-threatening reactions. But relief is likely on the way. Australian researchers found that their protocol to desensitize allergic children was effective in many for 4 years after treatment had ended.